What are erosional landforms?

By Ritesh|Updated : September 6th, 2022

The various landforms formed on the earth's surface due to erosion are called erosional landforms. Erosion is the wearing away of the landscape by multiple agents, such as water, wind, and ice. Valleys, potholes, rooted meanders, and river terraces are some examples of erosional landforms.

Erosional Landforms - Definition and Examples

Cave:

  • Waves often find some weakness or crack in the rock and widen it through hydraulic action.
  • It often leads to the formation of caves on the headland.

Arches:

  • The waves can then infiltrate the cave and erode the headland until they finally break through to produce an arc.
  • For example, Durdle Door, Dorset, UK.

Stacks and stumps:

  • As a result of constant weathering and erosion, the roof eventually collapses, leaving a tall, lonely stack.
  • For example, Old Harry, Dorset coast.

Cliffs:

  • The most prevalent type of coastal erosion on land is sea cliffs.
  • When destructive waves hit the base of the rock wall between the high and low water marks, the reefs start to form.

Wave Cut Platforms

  • A wave notch results from processes like corrosion and hydraulic action that undercut the reef's foundation.
  • The boulder above hangs over the notch, and as the wave surge continues, the gap widens, eventually causing the overhang to fall due to gravity.
  • The waves gently removed the tailings before attacking the fresh cliff face.

Summary:

What are erosional landforms?

Erosion is the process through which the terrain is worn away by different forces like water, wind, and ice.

  • Erosional landforms are the many landforms that have developed on the earth's surface due to erosion.
  • Arches Waves can enter a cave after it forms, then erode back into the headland until they finally break through to form an arch (for example, Durdle Door, Dorset, UK), Stumps, and piles.
  • As a result of constant weathering and erosion, the roof eventually collapses, leaving a tall, lonely stack (e.g., Old Harry, Dorset coast). Sea cliffs are the most typical terrain form of coastal erosion.

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