What are the traditional methods of water conservation?

By Ritesh|Updated : September 6th, 2022

Water is necessary, as we all know, yet far too many people mistakenly believe it is unending. Fresh water is a finite resource that is dwindling quickly. In India, a rising climate is causing lakes and rivers to dry up, and the quantity and quality of surface and groundwater are under tremendous pressure from growing urbanization and water pollution.

Traditional Methods of Water Conservation

The delicate agricultural system of the nation is still largely dependent on rainfall, and a poor monsoon season can completely wreck the economy.

  • Water catchment systems are mentioned in Chanakya's Arthashastra when discussing irrigation.
  • A complex water harvesting system was in place in Sringaverapura, close to Allahabad, which utilized the land's natural slope to store floodwaters from the Ganges River.
  • While King Bhoja of Bhopal constructed the largest artificial lake in India, King of Chola Karikala erected the Grand Anicut or Kallanai across the Cauvery River to redirect water for irrigation (it is still in use today).

In traditional rainwater harvesting methods, water is stored and also used to recharge groundwater.

Rajasthan:

  • Tanks, Khadins, Nadi.
  • Bawari is unique step-wells that were once part of an ancient network of water supplies in the cities of Rajasthan.

Maharashtra:

  • Bandharas and Tails.
  • The water-retention features in the Maharashtra town of Ramtek inspired the name of the Ramtek model.

Karnataka

  • Katta’s

Himachal Pradesh:

  • Kuhls.
  • The Bamboo Drip Irrigation System is an ingenious system of efficient water management practiced in Northeast India for over two centuries.
  • Canals bring glacial waters from rivers and streams to the fields.

Uttar Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh:

  • Bundhis

Kerala:

  • Surangams

Summary:

What are the traditional methods of water conservation?

The traditional method of water conservation, an effective water management technique, is the bamboo drip irrigation system used for more than 200 years in Northeast India.

  • A complex water harvesting system was in place in Sringaverapura, close to Allahabad, which utilized the land's natural slope to store floodwaters from the Ganges River.
  • While King Bhoja of Bhopal constructed the largest artificial lake in India, Chola King Karikala erected the Grand Anicut or Kallanai across the Cauvery River to redirect water for irrigation (it is still in use today).

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