The Magnetic Field Inside a Solenoid is

A solenoid is an electromagnet made of tightly coiled long wires arranged in the shape of a helix. Each turn can be thought of as a circular loop because the coil is closely packed. The field lines produced by the multiple solenoid loops connect to or supplement one another to establish an uniform magnetic field because each solenoid loop carries the same amount of current.

Answer - The magnetic field inside a solenoid is uniform.

The solenoid will produce a magnetic field if it is conducting current. The right-hand thumb rule can be used to determine the magnetic field's direction. The right-hand thumb rule can be described as what would happen if we curled our fingers around a circular wire in the magnetic field's direction. There will be a closed-loop in the magnetic field. 

The magnetic field within a solenoid will have straight lines and a strong field. The magnetic field will be feeble outside of the solenoid, and the field lines will curl into closed loops. As a result, a solenoid's magnetic field will be uniform.

Summary: 

The Magnetic Field Inside a Solenoid is

The magnetic field inside a solenoid is uniform. Since each solenoid loop carries the same amount of current, the field lines created by the various loops connect or augment one another to create a uniform magnetic field.

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