Difference Between Magistrate and Judge

By : Neha Dhyani

Updated : May 10, 2022, 7:39

A judiciary system, also known as judicature, judicial branch, or judicative branch, is a court system to settle legal disputes/disagreements and safeguard the interests of the citizens.

A magistrate and judge are part of the judiciary system but there is a Difference Between Magistrate and Judge.

Who is a Magistrate?

  • Warren Hastings introduced the position of magistrate in 1772
  • Magistrate' comes from a French word that means a civil officer.
  • A magistrate is a minor judicial system officer who governs law in a particular region, town, or district
  • They are responsible for ruling over many cases in one day
  • They are also responsible for gear applications for adjournment
  • They also decide penalties when a person pleads guilty - if a person challenges the decision, they decide whether the person is guilty or not
  • A magistrate does not have the same authority as a judge
  • A magistrate is appointed by the state government and the high court
  • There are four major types of magistrates: Judicial Magistrate, Chief judicial magistrate, Metropolitan magistrate, and Executive magistrate

Who is a Judge?

  • The word judge' comes from the Anglo-French word juger,' which means to shape an opinion on
  • A judge is also a judicial officer who administers court hearings and gives the final verdict over legal cases
  • The judge sits in the supreme court and is appointed by the president of India
  • A judge can give the final verdict alone or take help from a panel of judges
  • A judge has the authority to sentence someone to death
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Difference Between Magistrate and Judge

Here are some Differences Between Magistrate and Judge -

Magistrate

Judge

A Magistrate is appointed by the state government and the high court

A Judge is appointed by the President and the Governor

A law degree is not mandatory to become a magistrate

A law degree is mandatory to become a judge

A magistrate's area of jurisdiction is at the state level

A judge's area of jurisdiction is at a national level

A magistrate does not have the authority to impose a death sentence on a guilty person

A judge has the authority to impose a death sentence on a guilty person

A magistrate only handles minor cases

A judge handles complex cases

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The Judiciary system plays an important role in enforcing law across the nation and settling disputes between citizens, states, and other parties. Magistrates and Judges are the mechanisms in place through which the law is enforced, and conflicts are resolved.

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FAQs on the Difference Between Magistrate and Judge

Q.1. What is the Difference Between Magistrate and Judge?

The Difference Between Magistrate and Judge is that the state government and the high court appoint a magistrate, whereas the President and Governor appoint a judge. Additionally, a magistrate handles only minor cases but a judge can handle complex cases.

Q.2. What is the Key Difference Between Magistrate and Judge?

The Key Difference Between Magistrate and Judge is that a law degree is not mandatory to become a magistrate, whereas a law degree is mandatory to become a judge.

Q.3. Why is it important to Know the Difference Between Magistrate and Judge?

It is essential to Know the Difference Between Magistrate and Judge to understand the judicial system clearly.

Q.4. What is the Difference Between Magistrate and Judge regarding power?

The Difference Between Magistrate and Judge regarding power is that a judge is more powerful as they have the authority to impose a death sentence on a guilty person, and a magistrate does not have the authority to impose a death sentence.