Dam Rehabilitation and Improvement Project

By : Neha Dhyani

Updated : Mar 3, 2022, 11:54

Rainfall accounts for the vast majority of water received in India. However, due to heavy rainfall, several rivers can overflow and cause flooding. Furthermore, droughts occur in several parts of the country when the monsoon fails. The best way to address this issue is to construct dams on rivers. Dams collect excess rainfall and store it in reservoirs. This prevents flooding, and the reservoir's water can be used in the event of a monsoon failure. Dam construction is critical for a country's water security.

Dam reservoir water is also used for irrigation and industrial purposes. Dams are also important because they serve as a source of hydroelectricity. India has developed the Dam Rehabilitation and Improvement Project in order to strengthen these dam benefits as well as dam activities and operations (DRIP). After China and the United States of America, India ranks third in the world with 5334 operational dams and 411 under construction. Maharashtra has the most dams, with 2354, making it the state with the most dams in India.

Dam Rehabilitation and Improvement Project (DRIP)

India embarked on ensuring water security of the country which led to the six-year DRIP project. The project proposal was initiated by the Ministry of Water Resources and Central Water Commission to improve the functionality and working performance of selected dams.

Revisions in Dam Rehabilitation and Improvement Project

Year

Revisions

Cost in INR

April 2012

Proposal of funding for improving efficiency and safety of dams

2100 crore

June 2018

Approval of revised cost and extension of 2 years for the Dam rehabilitation and improvement project

3466 crores

October 2020

Approval of revised cost for DRIP Phase II and III, which will be implemented over a 10-year period from April 2021 to March 2031

10,211 crores

The first phase of DRIP included 223 dams and improved them in context to safety and performance. The first phase implemented the Dam Health Rehabilitation Monitoring Application (DHARMA) which was the first time when artificial intelligence software was used for monitoring the health of dams. The first phase was a great success and closed in March 2021. The success of early DRIP lead to the proposal and approval of phases II III of DRIP

  • 736 dams will be covered in the project in two phases.
  • The World Bank and Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) will fund the DRIP phase II-III.
  • The phases will be commenced over 10 years, from April 2021 to March 2031
  • The loan agreement starts for 10 states which include Gujarat, Meghalaya, Manipur, Madhya Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, Odisha, Rajasthan, Maharashtra, Kerala, and Tamil Nadu.

Objectives of DRIP Phase II and III

Dams in India are essential for sufficing the water needs of the country. The DRIP phase I and II aims to enhance the safety and resilience of the dams with the following detailed objectives

  • Proper and regular maintenance and correction of structural deficiencies of the dams. This ensures strengthening the structures of the dams and reduces the chances of collapsing and breakdowns due to the ageing of dams.
  • Enhancing the technical efficiency of the dams.
  • Implement rules and regulations in order to follow a structured way of operating the dams. This would ensure that the dams work smoothly without any glitches.
  • Enhance the coping capabilities and resilience against the increased threat of climate change by the implementation of emergency action plans.
  • With the Dam Rehabilitation and Improvement Project, India is moving ahead with a vision to improve water security in the country.
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FAQs on Dam Rehabilitation and Improvement Project

Q.1) What is the aim of implementing the Dam Rehabilitation and Improvement Project (DRIP)?

The objective of the Dam Rehabilitation and Improvement Project is to enhance the safety, efficiency, and performance of existing and new dams in India.

Q.2) How many dams were included for phases II and III of the Dam Rehabilitation and Improvement Project (DRIP)?

736 dams were included for phases II and III of the Dam Rehabilitation and Improvement Project (DRIP).

Q.3) How many dams does India have?

India ranks in the 3rd position in the world with 5334 operative dams and 411 under construction.