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SSC: Reading Comprehension Quiz: 25.02.2018

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Question 1

Read the passage carefully and select the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

Worry is a very common thing. Even children worry as much as grown-up people. In his childhood, the writer used to fear that his parents would die suddenly at night. His fear and anxiety were just imaginary. When he was on the war front in Mesopotamia, the writer came to a certain conclusion on worrying. He was a subaltern officer. It was not his duty to plan future actions of war. He was there only to carry out what the superiors would decide. So it was useless to worry. When he took that stand he slept soundly without worry. Here, the writer had some real reason to worry. But he could get rid of it when he found it was useless to worry. He followed the same principle when he was a prisoner of war and he was in Asiatic Turkey. There, too, he banished his worries because nothing of his future depended on himself. The future of the prisoners of war would depend on the various governments. Thus he was able to live there without much worry though he was a prisoner. But his deliberate suppression of worry during the war and as a prisoner did not wholly eradicate his worries. The fear had gone to his subconscious mind and remained there buried. After the war, the writer was at home. But whenever a member of his family was absent he feared all sorts of a mishap happening to him or her. Moreover, he had a recurring nightmare that he had become a prisoner of war and the war was not going to end. The worries without any real cause here were the manifestations of the fears that he had banished deliberately earlier.
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Why was the writer able to live in jail without much worry?

Question 2

Read the passage carefully and select the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

Worry is a very common thing. Even children worry as much as grown-up people. In his childhood, the writer used to fear that his parents would die suddenly at night. His fear and anxiety were just imaginary. When he was on the war front in Mesopotamia, the writer came to a certain conclusion on worrying. He was a subaltern officer. It was not his duty to plan future actions of war. He was there only to carry out what the superiors would decide. So it was useless to worry. When he took that stand he slept soundly without worry. Here, the writer had some real reason to worry. But he could get rid of it when he found it was useless to worry. He followed the same principle when he was a prisoner of war and he was in Asiatic Turkey. There, too, he banished his worries because nothing of his future depended on himself. The future of the prisoners of war would depend on the various governments. Thus he was able to live there without much worry though he was a prisoner. But his deliberate suppression of worry during the war and as a prisoner did not wholly eradicate his worries. The fear had gone to his subconscious mind and remained there buried. After the war, the writer was at home. But whenever a member of his family was absent he feared all sorts of a mishap happening to him or her. Moreover, he had a recurring nightmare that he had become a prisoner of war and the war was not going to end. The worries without any real cause here were the manifestations of the fears that he had banished deliberately earlier.
...Read More
What was the fear of the writer in his childhood?

Question 3

Read the passage carefully and select the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

Worry is a very common thing. Even children worry as much as grown-up people. In his childhood, the writer used to fear that his parents would die suddenly at night. His fear and anxiety were just imaginary. When he was on the war front in Mesopotamia, the writer came to a certain conclusion on worrying. He was a subaltern officer. It was not his duty to plan future actions of war. He was there only to carry out what the superiors would decide. So it was useless to worry. When he took that stand he slept soundly without worry. Here, the writer had some real reason to worry. But he could get rid of it when he found it was useless to worry. He followed the same principle when he was a prisoner of war and he was in Asiatic Turkey. There, too, he banished his worries because nothing of his future depended on himself. The future of the prisoners of war would depend on the various governments. Thus he was able to live there without much worry though he was a prisoner. But his deliberate suppression of worry during the war and as a prisoner did not wholly eradicate his worries. The fear had gone to his subconscious mind and remained there buried. After the war, the writer was at home. But whenever a member of his family was absent he feared all sorts of a mishap happening to him or her. Moreover, he had a recurring nightmare that he had become a prisoner of war and the war was not going to end. The worries without any real cause here were the manifestations of the fears that he had banished deliberately earlier.
...Read More
Where was the writer when he concluded that worry was useless?

Question 4

Read the passage carefully and select the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
Worry is a very common thing. Even children worry as much as grown-up people. In his childhood, the writer used to fear that his parents would die suddenly at night. His fear and anxiety were just imaginary. When he was on the war front in Mesopotamia, the writer came to a certain conclusion on worrying. He was a subaltern officer. It was not his duty to plan future actions of war. He was there only to carry out what the superiors would decide. So it was useless to worry. When he took that stand he slept soundly without worry. Here, the writer had some real reason to worry. But he could get rid of it when he found it was useless to worry. He followed the same principle when he was a prisoner of war and he was in Asiatic Turkey. There, too, he banished his worries because nothing of his future depended on himself. The future of the prisoners of war would depend on the various governments. Thus he was able to live there without much worry though he was a prisoner. But his deliberate suppression of worry during the war and as a prisoner did not wholly eradicate his worries. The fear had gone to his subconscious mind and remained there buried. After the war, the writer was at home. But whenever a member of his family was absent he feared all sorts of a mishap happening to him or her. Moreover, he had a recurring nightmare that he had become a prisoner of war and the war was not going to end. The worries without any real cause here were the manifestations of the fears that he had banished deliberately earlier.
...Read More
What was the recurring nightmare of the writer after the war was over?

Question 5

Read the passage carefully and select the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
Worry is a very common thing. Even children worry as much as grown-up people. In his childhood, the writer used to fear that his parents would die suddenly at night. His fear and anxiety were just imaginary. When he was on the war front in Mesopotamia, the writer came to a certain conclusion on worrying. He was a subaltern officer. It was not his duty to plan future actions of war. He was there only to carry out what the superiors would decide. So it was useless to worry. When he took that stand he slept soundly without worry. Here, the writer had some real reason to worry. But he could get rid of it when he found it was useless to worry. He followed the same principle when he was a prisoner of war and he was in Asiatic Turkey. There, too, he banished his worries because nothing of his future depended on himself. The future of the prisoners of war would depend on the various governments. Thus he was able to live there without much worry though he was a prisoner. But his deliberate suppression of worry during the war and as a prisoner did not wholly eradicate his worries. The fear had gone to his subconscious mind and remained there buried. After the war, the writer was at home. But whenever a member of his family was absent he feared all sorts of a mishap happening to him or her. Moreover, he had a recurring nightmare that he had become a prisoner of war and the war was not going to end. The worries without any real cause here were the manifestations of the fears that he had banished deliberately earlier.
...Read More
How does a cause of worry trouble us if we suppress our worry deliberately?

Question 6

Read the passage carefully and select the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

ITO analyzed developing countries should regard industry as either based on natural raw materials or on partly or fully finished materials. Most of the industries based on raw materials could be classified as heavy industries. Most of the industries that use materials that are processed to various degrees could be classified as light industries. But another name, basic industries more accurately, describes the operations that depend on raw natural resources; they are basic in the sense that they are the starting point in the process; they convert natural resources into materials used for making mother product.
Manufacturing must start raw materials. Deriving from animal, vegetable or mineral origin. Without manufacturing the uses of the natural raw materials in their original form are few. Industrial products can be divided according to the three stages of manufacturing : basic, intermediate and final. In some cases these stages occur in different factories at separate locations. The sample industries combine two or even all phases in one factory. For example, the sugar industry often starts by crushing the Sugarcane and ends with processed sugar packed for the individual customer. Most industries produce a partially finished, or intermediate product that goes to other factories to be made into final products. A basic metal factory, for instance, will make steel from iron ore, the steel will then be sent to a metal assembling factory, which may either take a final product or parts for an assembly industry.
Raw material industries, unlike industries in the advanced phase of manufacturing, usually require large operation to reduce product costs per unit, called ‘economics of scale’. Steel factories, cement operations, pulp, paper mills and oil processing faces are examples of such raw material industries. However, some raw material industries such as those involved in food processing, do not have great economics of scale. The large heavy industries usually require extensive capital investment, but create relatively little employment. In heavy industries, the trend is clearly towards more automatic machine process that steadily reduces employment opportunities. These industries produce more than can be absorbed by the markets that exist in many developing countries. Consequently, they often manufacture their products for the international export market.
...Read More
Big operations of raw material industry help in

Question 7

Read the passage carefully and select the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

ITO analyzed developing countries should regard industry as either based on natural raw materials or on partly or fully finished materials. Most of the industries based on raw materials could be classified as heavy industries. Most of the industries that use materials that are processed to various degrees could be classified as light industries. But another name, basic industries more accurately, describes the operations that depend on raw natural resources; they are basic in the sense that they are the starting point in the process; they convert natural resources into materials used for making mother product.
Manufacturing must start raw materials. Deriving from animal, vegetable or mineral origin. Without manufacturing the uses of the natural raw materials in their original form are few. Industrial products can be divided according to the three stages of manufacturing : basic, intermediate and final. In some cases these stages occur in different factories at separate locations. The sample industries combine two or even all phases in one factory. For example, the sugar industry often starts by crushing the Sugarcane and ends with processed sugar packed for the individual customer. Most industries produce a partially finished, or intermediate product that goes to other factories to be made into final products. A basic metal factory, for instance, will make steel from iron ore, the steel will then be sent to a metal assembling factory, which may either take a final product or parts for an assembly industry.
Raw material industries, unlike industries in the advanced phase of manufacturing, usually require large operation to reduce product costs per unit, called ‘economics of scale’. Steel factories, cement operations, pulp, paper mills and oil processing faces are examples of such raw material industries. However, some raw material industries such as those involved in food processing, do not have great economics of scale. The large heavy industries usually require extensive capital investment, but create relatively little employment. In heavy industries, the trend is clearly towards more automatic machine process that steadily reduces employment opportunities. These industries produce more than can be absorbed by the markets that exist in many developing countries. Consequently, they often manufacture their products for the international export market.
...Read More
Which of the following is the main reason for heavy industry exporting its products?

Question 8

Read the passage carefully and select the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
ITO analyzed developing countries should regard industry as either based on natural raw materials or on partly or fully finished materials. Most of the industries based on raw materials could be classified as heavy industries. Most of the industries that use materials that are processed to various degrees could be classified as light industries. But another name, basic industries more accurately, describes the operations that depend on raw natural resources; they are basic in the sense that they are the starting point in the process; they convert natural resources into materials used for making mother product.
Manufacturing must start raw materials. Deriving from animal, vegetable or mineral origin. Without manufacturing the uses of the natural raw materials in their original form are few. Industrial products can be divided according to the three stages of manufacturing : basic, intermediate and final. In some cases these stages occur in different factories at separate locations. The sample industries combine two or even all phases in one factory. For example, the sugar industry often starts by crushing the Sugarcane and ends with processed sugar packed for the individual customer. Most industries produce a partially finished, or intermediate product that goes to other factories to be made into final products. A basic metal factory, for instance, will make steel from iron ore, the steel will then be sent to a metal assembling factory, which may either take a final product or parts for an assembly industry.
Raw material industries, unlike industries in the advanced phase of manufacturing, usually require large operation to reduce product costs per unit, called ‘economics of scale’. Steel factories, cement operations, pulp, paper mills and oil processing faces are examples of such raw material industries. However, some raw material industries such as those involved in food processing, do not have great economics of scale. The large heavy industries usually require extensive capital investment, but create relatively little employment. In heavy industries, the trend is clearly towards more automatic machine process that steadily reduces employment opportunities. These industries produce more than can be absorbed by the markets that exist in many developing countries. Consequently, they often manufacture their products for the international export market.
...Read More
Which of the following is true about the three stages of manufacturing ?

Question 9

Read the passage carefully and select the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
ITO analyzed developing countries should regard industry as either based on natural raw materials or on partly or fully finished materials. Most of the industries based on raw materials could be classified as heavy industries. Most of the industries that use materials that are processed to various degrees could be classified as light industries. But another name, basic industries more accurately, describes the operations that depend on raw natural resources; they are basic in the sense that they are the starting point in the process; they convert natural resources into materials used for making mother product.
Manufacturing must start raw materials. Deriving from animal, vegetable or mineral origin. Without manufacturing the uses of the natural raw materials in their original form are few. Industrial products can be divided according to the three stages of manufacturing : basic, intermediate and final. In some cases these stages occur in different factories at separate locations. The sample industries combine two or even all phases in one factory. For example, the sugar industry often starts by crushing the Sugarcane and ends with processed sugar packed for the individual customer. Most industries produce a partially finished, or intermediate product that goes to other factories to be made into final products. A basic metal factory, for instance, will make steel from iron ore, the steel will then be sent to a metal assembling factory, which may either take a final product or parts for an assembly industry.
Raw material industries, unlike industries in the advanced phase of manufacturing, usually require large operation to reduce product costs per unit, called ‘economics of scale’. Steel factories, cement operations, pulp, paper mills and oil processing faces are examples of such raw material industries. However, some raw material industries such as those involved in food processing, do not have great economics of scale. The large heavy industries usually require extensive capital investment, but create relatively little employment. In heavy industries, the trend is clearly towards more automatic machine process that steadily reduces employment opportunities. These industries produce more than can be absorbed by the markets that exist in many developing countries. Consequently, they often manufacture their products for the international export market.
...Read More
Why is the processing of raw materials required’?

Question 10

Read the passage carefully and select the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
ITO analyzed developing countries should regard industry as either based on natural raw materials or on partly or fully finished materials. Most of the industries based on raw materials could be classified as heavy industries. Most of the industries that use materials that are processed to various degrees could be classified as light industries. But another name, basic industries more accurately, describes the operations that depend on raw natural resources; they are basic in the sense that they are the starting point in the process; they convert natural resources into materials used for making mother product.
Manufacturing must start raw materials. Deriving from animal, vegetable or mineral origin. Without manufacturing the uses of the natural raw materials in their original form are few. Industrial products can be divided according to the three stages of manufacturing : basic, intermediate and final. In some cases these stages occur in different factories at separate locations. The sample industries combine two or even all phases in one factory. For example, the sugar industry often starts by crushing the Sugarcane and ends with processed sugar packed for the individual customer. Most industries produce a partially finished, or intermediate product that goes to other factories to be made into final products. A basic metal factory, for instance, will make steel from iron ore, the steel will then be sent to a metal assembling factory, which may either take a final product or parts for an assembly industry.
Raw material industries, unlike industries in the advanced phase of manufacturing, usually require large operation to reduce product costs per unit, called ‘economics of scale’. Steel factories, cement operations, pulp, paper mills and oil processing faces are examples of such raw material industries. However, some raw material industries such as those involved in food processing, do not have great economics of scale. The large heavy industries usually require extensive capital investment, but create relatively little employment. In heavy industries, the trend is clearly towards more automatic machine process that steadily reduces employment opportunities. These industries produce more than can be absorbed by the markets that exist in many developing countries. Consequently, they often manufacture their products for the international export market.
...Read More
‘Economics of Scale’ is mainly adopted by
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Feb 25SSC & Railway

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Sudhir BhatiSudhir BhatiMember since Jul 2017
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