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SSC: Reading Comprehension Quiz: 03.04.2021

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Question 1

Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow.
In 18th-century Germany, Baron Munchausen regales his friends, over drinks, with stories of his many adventures. These include his supposed travel to the moon. Long before Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin stepped out of Apollo 11 onto the surface of the moon 50 years ago, on July 20, 1969, the aspiration to travel to this shiny orb in the sky has fired human imagination. A Flight To The Moon by George Fowler, From The Earth To The Moon – and its sequel, Around The Moon – by Jules Verne, The First Men In The Moon by HG Wells, Prelude To Space by Arthur C Clarke… are only a few of the many fictionalised accounts that have, for centuries, reflected this aspiration. In the 1954 Explorers On The Moon, iconic comic book character, Tintin, reaches the moon. While some writers imagined the moon’s surface to be barren and uninhabited, others have written about it being populated with lunar beings. Even when Apollo 11 mission was being planned and worked on, in 1963, Apollo At Go by Jeff Sutton, presented a realistic fictionalised portrayal of the upcoming landing.
The successful landing of Apollo 11 and Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin’s walk on the moon, opened up another exciting possibility – could the common man or non-space-scientist reach for the moon? Literally? What had hitherto been in the realm of speculation was now a reality and we weren’t satisfied with just second-hand information any more. Between 1969 and 1972, the US sent six successful manned missions to the moon, and with each victory, the lunar destination seemed a little closer within the reach of the common man.

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When did the US send first successful manned trip to the moon?

Question 2

Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow.
In 18th-century Germany, Baron Munchausen regales his friends, over drinks, with stories of his many adventures. These include his supposed travel to the moon. Long before Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin stepped out of Apollo 11 onto the surface of the moon 50 years ago, on July 20, 1969, the aspiration to travel to this shiny orb in the sky has fired human imagination. A Flight To The Moon by George Fowler, From The Earth To The Moon – and its sequel, Around The Moon – by Jules Verne, The First Men In The Moon by HG Wells, Prelude To Space by Arthur C Clarke… are only a few of the many fictionalised accounts that have, for centuries, reflected this aspiration. In the 1954 Explorers On The Moon, iconic comic book character, Tintin, reaches the moon. While some writers imagined the moon’s surface to be barren and uninhabited, others have written about it being populated with lunar beings. Even when Apollo 11 mission was being planned and worked on, in 1963, Apollo At Go by Jeff Sutton, presented a realistic fictionalised portrayal of the upcoming landing.
The successful landing of Apollo 11 and Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin’s walk on the moon, opened up another exciting possibility – could the common man or non-space-scientist reach for the moon? Literally? What had hitherto been in the realm of speculation was now a reality and we weren’t satisfied with just second-hand information any more. Between 1969 and 1972, the US sent six successful manned missions to the moon, and with each victory, the lunar destination seemed a little closer within the reach of the common man.

...Read More
Who was the first person to speak of travel to the moon?

Question 3

Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow.
In 18th-century Germany, Baron Munchausen regales his friends, over drinks, with stories of his many adventures. These include his supposed travel to the moon. Long before Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin stepped out of Apollo 11 onto the surface of the moon 50 years ago, on July 20, 1969, the aspiration to travel to this shiny orb in the sky has fired human imagination. A Flight To The Moon by George Fowler, From The Earth To The Moon – and its sequel, Around The Moon – by Jules Verne, The First Men In The Moon by HG Wells, Prelude To Space by Arthur C Clarke… are only a few of the many fictionalised accounts that have, for centuries, reflected this aspiration. In the 1954 Explorers On The Moon, iconic comic book character, Tintin, reaches the moon. While some writers imagined the moon’s surface to be barren and uninhabited, others have written about it being populated with lunar beings. Even when Apollo 11 mission was being planned and worked on, in 1963, Apollo At Go by Jeff Sutton, presented a realistic fictionalised portrayal of the upcoming landing.
The successful landing of Apollo 11 and Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin’s walk on the moon, opened up another exciting possibility – could the common man or non-space-scientist reach for the moon? Literally? What had hitherto been in the realm of speculation was now a reality and we weren’t satisfied with just second-hand information any more. Between 1969 and 1972, the US sent six successful manned missions to the moon, and with each victory, the lunar destination seemed a little closer within the reach of the common man.

...Read More
Which of the following statements is not true according to the passage?

Question 4

Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow.
In 18th-century Germany, Baron Munchausen regales his friends, over drinks, with stories of his many adventures. These include his supposed travel to the moon. Long before Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin stepped out of Apollo 11 onto the surface of the moon 50 years ago, on July 20, 1969, the aspiration to travel to this shiny orb in the sky has fired human imagination. A Flight To The Moon by George Fowler, From The Earth To The Moon – and its sequel, Around The Moon – by Jules Verne, The First Men In The Moon by HG Wells, Prelude To Space by Arthur C Clarke… are only a few of the many fictionalised accounts that have, for centuries, reflected this aspiration. In the 1954 Explorers On The Moon, iconic comic book character, Tintin, reaches the moon. While some writers imagined the moon’s surface to be barren and uninhabited, others have written about it being populated with lunar beings. Even when Apollo 11 mission was being planned and worked on, in 1963, Apollo At Go by Jeff Sutton, presented a realistic fictionalised portrayal of the upcoming landing.
The successful landing of Apollo 11 and Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin’s walk on the moon, opened up another exciting possibility – could the common man or non-space-scientist reach for the moon? Literally? What had hitherto been in the realm of speculation was now a reality and we weren’t satisfied with just second-hand information any more. Between 1969 and 1972, the US sent six successful manned missions to the moon, and with each victory, the lunar destination seemed a little closer within the reach of the common man.

...Read More
The writer uses the expression ‘literally’ because___

Question 5

Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow.
In 18th-century Germany, Baron Munchausen regales his friends, over drinks, with stories of his many adventures. These include his supposed travel to the moon. Long before Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin stepped out of Apollo 11 onto the surface of the moon 50 years ago, on July 20, 1969, the aspiration to travel to this shiny orb in the sky has fired human imagination. A Flight To The Moon by George Fowler, From The Earth To The Moon – and its sequel, Around The Moon – by Jules Verne, The First Men In The Moon by HG Wells, Prelude To Space by Arthur C Clarke… are only a few of the many fictionalised accounts that have, for centuries, reflected this aspiration. In the 1954 Explorers On The Moon, iconic comic book character, Tintin, reaches the moon. While some writers imagined the moon’s surface to be barren and uninhabited, others have written about it being populated with lunar beings. Even when Apollo 11 mission was being planned and worked on, in 1963, Apollo At Go by Jeff Sutton, presented a realistic fictionalised portrayal of the upcoming landing.
The successful landing of Apollo 11 and Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin’s walk on the moon, opened up another exciting possibility – could the common man or non-space-scientist reach for the moon? Literally? What had hitherto been in the realm of speculation was now a reality and we weren’t satisfied with just second-hand information any more. Between 1969 and 1972, the US sent six successful manned missions to the moon, and with each victory, the lunar destination seemed a little closer within the reach of the common man.

...Read More
How many fictional books written about travelling to the moon are referred to here?

Question 6

Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow.

Our civilization is more secure because it is much more widely spread. Most of the previous civilizations came to an end because uncivilized peoples broke in and destroyed them. This was the fate of Babylon, Assyria, India, China, Greece and Rome. Previous civilizations were specialized and limited like an oasis in a surrounding desert of savagery. Eventually, the desert closed in and the oasis was no more. But to-day, it is the oasis which is spreading over the desert. Practically no part of the world is untouched by it.

For the first time, the world has now a chance of becoming a single whole, a unity. To-day, the food we eat comes from all over the world. The things in a grocer’s shop are from the ends of the earth. There are oranges from Brazil, grapes from Africa, rice from India, tea from china, sugar from Columbia etc.

To-day the world is beginning to look more like one enormous box. Therefore, there is little danger upon our civilization from outside. The danger comes only from within; it is a danger from among us.

To-day, the sharing-out of money – the sharing-out of food, clothing, houses and books, is still very unfair. In England alone, in sharing out of the National Income, we find that one half is divided among every sixteen people and the seventeenth person gets the other half. So while some few people live in luxury, many have not even enough to eat and drink and wear. Again, in England to-day, thousands of people live in dreadful surroundings. There are many families of five or six persons who live in a single room; in this same room they are born and in this same room they die, because, they are too poor to afford another room. Until everyone gets his proper share of necessary and delightful things, our civilization will not be perfect.

...Read More

‘This’ in the third sentence refers to

Question 7

Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow.

Our civilization is more secure because it is much more widely spread. Most of the previous civilizations came to an end because uncivilized peoples broke in and destroyed them. This was the fate of Babylon, Assyria, India, China, Greece and Rome. Previous civilizations were specialized and limited like an oasis in a surrounding desert of savagery. Eventually, the desert closed in and the oasis was no more. But to-day, it is the oasis which is spreading over the desert. Practically no part of the world is untouched by it.

For the first time, the world has now a chance of becoming a single whole, a unity. To-day, the food we eat comes from all over the world. The things in a grocer’s shop are from the ends of the earth. There are oranges from Brazil, grapes from Africa, rice from India, tea from china, sugar from Columbia etc.

To-day the world is beginning to look more like one enormous box. Therefore, there is little danger upon our civilization from outside. The danger comes only from within; it is a danger from among us.

To-day, the sharing-out of money – the sharing-out of food, clothing, houses and books, is still very unfair. In England alone, in sharing out of the National Income, we find that one half is divided among every sixteen people and the seventeenth person gets the other half. So while some few people live in luxury, many have not even enough to eat and drink and wear. Again, in England to-day, thousands of people live in dreadful surroundings. There are many families of five or six persons who live in a single room; in this same room they are born and in this same room they die, because, they are too poor to afford another room. Until everyone gets his proper share of necessary and delightful things, our civilization will not be perfect.

...Read More
What is one of the greatest disadvantages of the present times?

Question 8

Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow.

Our civilization is more secure because it is much more widely spread. Most of the previous civilizations came to an end because uncivilized peoples broke in and destroyed them. This was the fate of Babylon, Assyria, India, China, Greece and Rome. Previous civilizations were specialized and limited like an oasis in a surrounding desert of savagery. Eventually, the desert closed in and the oasis was no more. But to-day, it is the oasis which is spreading over the desert. Practically no part of the world is untouched by it.

For the first time, the world has now a chance of becoming a single whole, a unity. To-day, the food we eat comes from all over the world. The things in a grocer’s shop are from the ends of the earth. There are oranges from Brazil, grapes from Africa, rice from India, tea from china, sugar from Columbia etc.

To-day the world is beginning to look more like one enormous box. Therefore, there is little danger upon our civilization from outside. The danger comes only from within; it is a danger from among us.

To-day, the sharing-out of money – the sharing-out of food, clothing, houses and books, is still very unfair. In England alone, in sharing out of the National Income, we find that one half is divided among every sixteen people and the seventeenth person gets the other half. So while some few people live in luxury, many have not even enough to eat and drink and wear. Again, in England to-day, thousands of people live in dreadful surroundings. There are many families of five or six persons who live in a single room; in this same room they are born and in this same room they die, because, they are too poor to afford another room. Until everyone gets his proper share of necessary and delightful things, our civilization will not be perfect.

...Read More
Which important feature of modern life troubles the writer most?

Question 9

Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow.

Our civilization is more secure because it is much more widely spread. Most of the previous civilizations came to an end because uncivilized peoples broke in and destroyed them. This was the fate of Babylon, Assyria, India, China, Greece and Rome. Previous civilizations were specialized and limited like an oasis in a surrounding desert of savagery. Eventually, the desert closed in and the oasis was no more. But to-day, it is the oasis which is spreading over the desert. Practically no part of the world is untouched by it.

For the first time, the world has now a chance of becoming a single whole, a unity. To-day, the food we eat comes from all over the world. The things in a grocer’s shop are from the ends of the earth. There are oranges from Brazil, grapes from Africa, rice from India, tea from china, sugar from Columbia etc.

To-day the world is beginning to look more like one enormous box. Therefore, there is little danger upon our civilization from outside. The danger comes only from within; it is a danger from among us.

To-day, the sharing-out of money – the sharing-out of food, clothing, houses and books, is still very unfair. In England alone, in sharing out of the National Income, we find that one half is divided among every sixteen people and the seventeenth person gets the other half. So while some few people live in luxury, many have not even enough to eat and drink and wear. Again, in England to-day, thousands of people live in dreadful surroundings. There are many families of five or six persons who live in a single room; in this same room they are born and in this same room they die, because, they are too poor to afford another room. Until everyone gets his proper share of necessary and delightful things, our civilization will not be perfect.

...Read More
What according to the writer was the desert that surrounded the oasis?

Question 10

Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow.

Our civilization is more secure because it is much more widely spread. Most of the previous civilizations came to an end because uncivilized peoples broke in and destroyed them. This was the fate of Babylon, Assyria, India, China, Greece and Rome. Previous civilizations were specialized and limited like an oasis in a surrounding desert of savagery. Eventually, the desert closed in and the oasis was no more. But to-day, it is the oasis which is spreading over the desert. Practically no part of the world is untouched by it.

For the first time, the world has now a chance of becoming a single whole, a unity. To-day, the food we eat comes from all over the world. The things in a grocer’s shop are from the ends of the earth. There are oranges from Brazil, grapes from Africa, rice from India, tea from china, sugar from Columbia etc.

To-day the world is beginning to look more like one enormous box. Therefore, there is little danger upon our civilization from outside. The danger comes only from within; it is a danger from among us.

To-day, the sharing-out of money – the sharing-out of food, clothing, houses and books, is still very unfair. In England alone, in sharing out of the National Income, we find that one half is divided among every sixteen people and the seventeenth person gets the other half. So while some few people live in luxury, many have not even enough to eat and drink and wear. Again, in England to-day, thousands of people live in dreadful surroundings. There are many families of five or six persons who live in a single room; in this same room they are born and in this same room they die, because, they are too poor to afford another room. Until everyone gets his proper share of necessary and delightful things, our civilization will not be perfect.

...Read More
Which of the following statements is NOT true according to the facts given in the passage.
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Apr 3SSC & Railway

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Yitika SainiYitika SainiMember since Feb 2020
I have been mentoring students for 2.5 years. Cleared exams like SSC CGL, SSC CHSL, and Railway NTPC. And currently working as an ENGLISH Content Writer in Gradeup.
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