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SSC: Reading Comprehension Quiz: 02.02.2021

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Question 1

Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

In May 1966, the World Health Organization was authorized to intimate a global campaign to eradicate smallpox. The goal was to eradicate the disease in one decade. Because similar projects for malaria and yellow fever had failed, few believed that smallpox actually could not be eradicated, but eleven years after the initial organization of the campaign, no cases were reported in the field.
The strategy was not only to provide mass vaccinations, but also to isolate patients with active small-pox in order to contain the spread of the disease and to break the chain of human transmission. Rewards for reporting small-pox assisted in motivating the public to aid health workers. One by one, each small-pox victim was sought out, removed from contact with others and treated. At the same time, the entire village where the victim had lived was vaccinated.
Today small-pox is no longer a threat to humanity. Routine vaccinations have been stopped worldwide.
...Read More
Which of the following is the best title for the passage?

Question 2

Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

In May 1966, the World Health Organization was authorized to intimate a global campaign to eradicate smallpox. The goal was to eradicate the disease in one decade. Because similar projects for malaria and yellow fever had failed, few believed that smallpox actually could not be eradicated, but eleven years after the initial organization of the campaign, no cases were reported in the field.
The strategy was not only to provide mass vaccinations, but also to isolate patients with active small-pox in order to contain the spread of the disease and to break the chain of human transmission. Rewards for reporting small-pox assisted in motivating the public to aid health workers. One by one, each small-pox victim was sought out, removed from contact with others and treated. At the same time, the entire village where the victim had lived was vaccinated.
Today small-pox is no longer a threat to humanity. Routine vaccinations have been stopped worldwide.
...Read More
What was the goal of the campaign against small-pox?

Question 3

Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

In May 1966, the World Health Organization was authorized to intimate a global campaign to eradicate smallpox. The goal was to eradicate the disease in one decade. Because similar projects for malaria and yellow fever had failed, few believed that smallpox actually could not be eradicated, but eleven years after the initial organization of the campaign, no cases were reported in the field.
The strategy was not only to provide mass vaccinations, but also to isolate patients with active small-pox in order to contain the spread of the disease and to break the chain of human transmission. Rewards for reporting small-pox assisted in motivating the public to aid health workers. One by one, each small-pox victim was sought out, removed from contact with others and treated. At the same time, the entire village where the victim had lived was vaccinated.
Today small-pox is no longer a threat to humanity. Routine vaccinations have been stopped worldwide.
...Read More
According to the paragraph, which of the following strategies was used to eliminate the spread of small-pox?

Question 4

Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

In May 1966, the World Health Organization was authorized to intimate a global campaign to eradicate smallpox. The goal was to eradicate the disease in one decade. Because similar projects for malaria and yellow fever had failed, few believed that smallpox actually could not be eradicated, but eleven years after the initial organization of the campaign, no cases were reported in the field.
The strategy was not only to provide mass vaccinations, but also to isolate patients with active small-pox in order to contain the spread of the disease and to break the chain of human transmission. Rewards for reporting small-pox assisted in motivating the public to aid health workers. One by one, each small-pox victim was sought out, removed from contact with others and treated. At the same time, the entire village where the victim had lived was vaccinated.
Today small-pox is no longer a threat to humanity. Routine vaccinations have been stopped worldwide.
...Read More
Which statement doesn’t refer to small-pox?

Question 5

Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

In May 1966, the World Health Organization was authorized to intimate a global campaign to eradicate smallpox. The goal was to eradicate the disease in one decade. Because similar projects for malaria and yellow fever had failed, few believed that smallpox actually could not be eradicated, but eleven years after the initial organization of the campaign, no cases were reported in the field.
The strategy was not only to provide mass vaccinations, but also to isolate patients with active small-pox in order to contain the spread of the disease and to break the chain of human transmission. Rewards for reporting small-pox assisted in motivating the public to aid health workers. One by one, each small-pox victim was sought out, removed from contact with others and treated. At the same time, the entire village where the victim had lived was vaccinated.
Today small-pox is no longer a threat to humanity. Routine vaccinations have been stopped worldwide.
...Read More
Which of the following can be inferred from the passage?

Question 6

Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

Our awareness of time has reached such a pitch of intensity that we suffer acutely whenever our travels take us into some corner of the world where people are not interested in minutes and seconds. The unpunctuality of the Orient, for example, is appalling to those who come freshly from a land of fixed mealtimes and regular train services. For a modern American or Englishman; waiting is psychological torture. An Indian accepts the bank hours with resignation, even with satisfaction. He has not lost the fine art of doing anything. Our notion of time as a collection of minutes, each of which must be filled with some business or amusement, is wholly alien to the Greek. For the man who lives in a pre-industrial world, time moves at a slow and easy pace; for the good reason that he has not been made conscious of the existence of minutes.

...Read More
What is the main theme of the passage?

Question 7

Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

Our awareness of time has reached such a pitch of intensity that we suffer acutely whenever our travels take us into some corner of the world where people are not interested in minutes and seconds. The unpunctuality of the Orient, for example, is appalling to those who come freshly from a land of fixed mealtimes and regular train services. For a modern American or Englishman; waiting is psychological torture. An Indian accepts the bank hours with resignation, even with satisfaction. He has not lost the fine art of doing anything. Our notion of time as a collection of minutes, each of which must be filled with some business or amusement, is wholly alien to the Greek. For the man who lives in a pre-industrial world, time moves at a slow and easy pace; for the good reason that he has not been made conscious of the existence of minutes.

...Read More
The Greeks are alien to

Question 8

Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

Our awareness of time has reached such a pitch of intensity that we suffer acutely whenever our travels take us into some corner of the world where people are not interested in minutes and seconds. The unpunctuality of the Orient, for example, is appalling to those who come freshly from a land of fixed mealtimes and regular train services. For a modern American or Englishman; waiting is psychological torture. An Indian accepts the bank hours with resignation, even with satisfaction. He has not lost the fine art of doing anything. Our notion of time as a collection of minutes, each of which must be filled with some business or amusement, is wholly alien to the Greek. For the man who lives in a pre-industrial world, time moves at a slow and easy pace; for the good reason that he has not been made conscious of the existence of minutes.

...Read More
A person who belongs to pre-industrial world

Question 9

Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

Our awareness of time has reached such a pitch of intensity that we suffer acutely whenever our travels take us into some corner of the world where people are not interested in minutes and seconds. The unpunctuality of the Orient, for example, is appalling to those who come freshly from a land of fixed mealtimes and regular train services. For a modern American or Englishman; waiting is psychological torture. An Indian accepts the bank hours with resignation, even with satisfaction. He has not lost the fine art of doing anything. Our notion of time as a collection of minutes, each of which must be filled with some business or amusement, is wholly alien to the Greek. For the man who lives in a pre-industrial world, time moves at a slow and easy pace; for the good reason that he has not been made conscious of the existence of minutes.

...Read More
According to the author

Question 10

Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

Our awareness of time has reached such a pitch of intensity that we suffer acutely whenever our travels take us into some corner of the world where people are not interested in minutes and seconds. The unpunctuality of the Orient, for example, is appalling to those who come freshly from a land of fixed mealtimes and regular train services. For a modern American or Englishman; waiting is psychological torture. An Indian accepts the bank hours with resignation, even with satisfaction. He has not lost the fine art of doing anything. Our notion of time as a collection of minutes, each of which must be filled with some business or amusement, is wholly alien to the Greek. For the man who lives in a pre-industrial world, time moves at a slow and easy pace; for the good reason that he has not been made conscious of the existence of minutes.

...Read More
How does an Indian accept his/her bank hours?
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Feb 2SSC & Railway

Posted by:

Yitika SainiYitika SainiMember since Feb 2020
I have been mentoring students for 2.5 years. Cleared exams like SSC CGL, SSC CHSL, and Railway NTPC. And currently working as an ENGLISH Content Writer in Gradeup.
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