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Reading Comprehension quiz for SBI PO

Attempt now to get your rank among 1990 students!

Question 1

Direction: Read the given passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

With the military standoff between India and China continuing in the Doklam area of the India-China-Bhutan border trijunction, Beijing has resorted to harsh rhetoric to put psychological pressure on New Delhi. It has used state-run Chinese media to issue not-so-subtle threats to India, asking the latter to learn from the lessons of the 1962 conflict between the two countries. This is totally uncalled for and shows China – which seeks to be the pre-eminent Asian power – in poor light. It once again highlights Beijing’s lack of respect for a rule-based global order.
The facts on the ground are that the area under contention is disputed between Bhutan and China with India having security sensitivities in the same region. The problem arose when China unilaterally sought to change the status quo of the trijunction through its road building activities. India was forced to defend its own interests as well as those of its ally Bhutan when the Chinese side refused to seriously consider Thimphu’s protestations. Plus, China’s moves are in clear violation of a 2012 agreement that the boundaries in the trijunction point are to be decided by the three parties together.
The only way out of the current standoff is through dialogue. But China insists that Indian troops pull back first before negotiations. This is again unhelpful and underlines Beijing’s propensity to arm-twist its neighbours. This is precisely what it has been doing in the South China Sea through its island building activities. Beijing is very good at changing facts on the ground and slowing altering the status quo in its favour. Hence, its neighbours are now holding their ground more resolutely. As pointed out by external affairs minister Sushma Swaraj, a negotiated resolution to the Doklam standoff can be facilitated if both sides withdraw their troops from the area first. This will build the requisite mutual trust between the parties for talks.
It should also be recognised that such border disputes will continue to crop up until the boundary between India and China is fully demarcated. The Chinese attitude that the boundary only needs to be managed for the time being and a final resolution should be left to future generations no longer suffices. Both India and China should let go of past baggage and demarcate the boundary more or less along the present LAC alignment.
...Read More
What is the reason for Indian intervention in Doklam?

Question 2

Direction: Read the given passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

With the military standoff between India and China continuing in the Doklam area of the India-China-Bhutan border trijunction, Beijing has resorted to harsh rhetoric to put psychological pressure on New Delhi. It has used state-run Chinese media to issue not-so-subtle threats to India, asking the latter to learn from the lessons of the 1962 conflict between the two countries. This is totally uncalled for and shows China – which seeks to be the pre-eminent Asian power – in poor light. It once again highlights Beijing’s lack of respect for a rule-based global order.
The facts on the ground are that the area under contention is disputed between Bhutan and China with India having security sensitivities in the same region. The problem arose when China unilaterally sought to change the status quo of the trijunction through its road building activities. India was forced to defend its own interests as well as those of its ally Bhutan when the Chinese side refused to seriously consider Thimphu’s protestations. Plus, China’s moves are in clear violation of a 2012 agreement that the boundaries in the trijunction point are to be decided by the three parties together.
The only way out of the current standoff is through dialogue. But China insists that Indian troops pull back first before negotiations. This is again unhelpful and underlines Beijing’s propensity to arm-twist its neighbours. This is precisely what it has been doing in the South China Sea through its island building activities. Beijing is very good at changing facts on the ground and slowing altering the status quo in its favour. Hence, its neighbours are now holding their ground more resolutely. As pointed out by external affairs minister Sushma Swaraj, a negotiated resolution to the Doklam standoff can be facilitated if both sides withdraw their troops from the area first. This will build the requisite mutual trust between the parties for talks.
It should also be recognised that such border disputes will continue to crop up until the boundary between India and China is fully demarcated. The Chinese attitude that the boundary only needs to be managed for the time being and a final resolution should be left to future generations no longer suffices. Both India and China should let go of past baggage and demarcate the boundary more or less along the present LAC alignment.
...Read More
How is Beijing violating the 2012 agreement?

Question 3

Direction: Read the given passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

With the military standoff between India and China continuing in the Doklam area of the India-China-Bhutan border trijunction, Beijing has resorted to harsh rhetoric to put psychological pressure on New Delhi. It has used state-run Chinese media to issue not-so-subtle threats to India, asking the latter to learn from the lessons of the 1962 conflict between the two countries. This is totally uncalled for and shows China – which seeks to be the pre-eminent Asian power – in poor light. It once again highlights Beijing’s lack of respect for a rule-based global order.
The facts on the ground are that the area under contention is disputed between Bhutan and China with India having security sensitivities in the same region. The problem arose when China unilaterally sought to change the status quo of the trijunction through its road building activities. India was forced to defend its own interests as well as those of its ally Bhutan when the Chinese side refused to seriously consider Thimphu’s protestations. Plus, China’s moves are in clear violation of a 2012 agreement that the boundaries in the trijunction point are to be decided by the three parties together.
The only way out of the current standoff is through dialogue. But China insists that Indian troops pull back first before negotiations. This is again unhelpful and underlines Beijing’s propensity to arm-twist its neighbours. This is precisely what it has been doing in the South China Sea through its island building activities. Beijing is very good at changing facts on the ground and slowing altering the status quo in its favour. Hence, its neighbours are now holding their ground more resolutely. As pointed out by external affairs minister Sushma Swaraj, a negotiated resolution to the Doklam standoff can be facilitated if both sides withdraw their troops from the area first. This will build the requisite mutual trust between the parties for talks.
It should also be recognised that such border disputes will continue to crop up until the boundary between India and China is fully demarcated. The Chinese attitude that the boundary only needs to be managed for the time being and a final resolution should be left to future generations no longer suffices. Both India and China should let go of past baggage and demarcate the boundary more or less along the present LAC alignment.
...Read More
What is the Chinese precondition before any negotiations?

Question 4

Direction: Read the given passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

With the military standoff between India and China continuing in the Doklam area of the India-China-Bhutan border trijunction, Beijing has resorted to harsh rhetoric to put psychological pressure on New Delhi. It has used state-run Chinese media to issue not-so-subtle threats to India, asking the latter to learn from the lessons of the 1962 conflict between the two countries. This is totally uncalled for and shows China – which seeks to be the pre-eminent Asian power – in poor light. It once again highlights Beijing’s lack of respect for a rule-based global order.
The facts on the ground are that the area under contention is disputed between Bhutan and China with India having security sensitivities in the same region. The problem arose when China unilaterally sought to change the status quo of the trijunction through its road building activities. India was forced to defend its own interests as well as those of its ally Bhutan when the Chinese side refused to seriously consider Thimphu’s protestations. Plus, China’s moves are in clear violation of a 2012 agreement that the boundaries in the trijunction point are to be decided by the three parties together.
The only way out of the current standoff is through dialogue. But China insists that Indian troops pull back first before negotiations. This is again unhelpful and underlines Beijing’s propensity to arm-twist its neighbours. This is precisely what it has been doing in the South China Sea through its island building activities. Beijing is very good at changing facts on the ground and slowing altering the status quo in its favour. Hence, its neighbours are now holding their ground more resolutely. As pointed out by external affairs minister Sushma Swaraj, a negotiated resolution to the Doklam standoff can be facilitated if both sides withdraw their troops from the area first. This will build the requisite mutual trust between the parties for talks.
It should also be recognised that such border disputes will continue to crop up until the boundary between India and China is fully demarcated. The Chinese attitude that the boundary only needs to be managed for the time being and a final resolution should be left to future generations no longer suffices. Both India and China should let go of past baggage and demarcate the boundary more or less along the present LAC alignment.
...Read More
Which of the following is not one of the characteristics of the Chinese foreign policy?
 

Question 5

Direction: Read the given passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

With the military standoff between India and China continuing in the Doklam area of the India-China-Bhutan border trijunction, Beijing has resorted to harsh rhetoric to put psychological pressure on New Delhi. It has used state-run Chinese media to issue not-so-subtle threats to India, asking the latter to learn from the lessons of the 1962 conflict between the two countries. This is totally uncalled for and shows China – which seeks to be the pre-eminent Asian power – in poor light. It once again highlights Beijing’s lack of respect for a rule-based global order.
The facts on the ground are that the area under contention is disputed between Bhutan and China with India having security sensitivities in the same region. The problem arose when China unilaterally sought to change the status quo of the trijunction through its road building activities. India was forced to defend its own interests as well as those of its ally Bhutan when the Chinese side refused to seriously consider Thimphu’s protestations. Plus, China’s moves are in clear violation of a 2012 agreement that the boundaries in the trijunction point are to be decided by the three parties together.
The only way out of the current standoff is through dialogue. But China insists that Indian troops pull back first before negotiations. This is again unhelpful and underlines Beijing’s propensity to arm-twist its neighbours. This is precisely what it has been doing in the South China Sea through its island building activities. Beijing is very good at changing facts on the ground and slowing altering the status quo in its favour. Hence, its neighbours are now holding their ground more resolutely. As pointed out by external affairs minister Sushma Swaraj, a negotiated resolution to the Doklam standoff can be facilitated if both sides withdraw their troops from the area first. This will build the requisite mutual trust between the parties for talks.
It should also be recognised that such border disputes will continue to crop up until the boundary between India and China is fully demarcated. The Chinese attitude that the boundary only needs to be managed for the time being and a final resolution should be left to future generations no longer suffices. Both India and China should let go of past baggage and demarcate the boundary more or less along the present LAC alignment.
...Read More
What does the author mean by using the phrase ‘arm twist its neighbors’?
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Apr 18PO, Clerk, SO, Insurance

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Sheetal GoyalSheetal GoyalMember since Jan 2020
Academic counselor helping students to prepare for Bank and insurance exams.
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