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English Jumbo Quiz for IBPS/EPFO/RBI Exams 2019: 03.11.2019

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Question 1

Direction: In the given question, the first and the last parts of the sentence are numbered (1) and (6). The rest of the sentence is split into four parts and named P, Q, R and S. These four parts are not given in their proper order. Read the sentences and find out which of the five combinations is correct and mark the respective option.
1) I was shocked to see
P) unawareness of the fact that
Q) regarding their exams and their
R) the casualty of the children
S) board exams determine a huge
6) part of the future.

Question 2

Direction: In the given question, the first and the last parts of the sentence are numbered (1) and (6). The rest of the sentence is split into four parts and named P, Q, R and S. These four parts are not given in their proper order. Read the sentences and find out which of the five combinations is correct and mark the respective option.
1) Esha decided not to tell
P) and handle it herself. She even
Q) anyone about the financial crisis
R) had rejected earlier to
S) applied for all the jobs that she
6) support her family.

Question 3

Direction: In the following question, a statement divided into different segments is given. The first segment is fixed. Rearrange the other segments to form a coherent statement. If the sentence is already arranged or the correct sequence doesn't match any of the given sequences, mark (E) i.e. "None of the above" as your answer.
Today’s project management tools/ still help manage deadlines (P)/ and responsibilities but do much more by integrating sophisticated (Q)/ collaboration features, including shared file storage, places (R)/ for team members to leave comments and ask questions (S)

Question 4

Direction: In the given question, a part of the sentence is printed in bold. Below the sentence alternatives to the bold part are given at (A), (B), (C) and (D) which may help improve the sentence. Choose the correct alternative. In case the given sentence is correct, your answer is (E), i.e., 'No correction required'.

The actor was happy he got a part in a movie, since the part was a small one.

Question 5

Direction: In the given question, a part of the sentence is printed in bold. Below the sentence alternatives to the bold part are given at (A), (B), (C) and (D) which may help improve the sentence. Choose the correct alternative. In case the given sentence is correct, your answer is (E), i.e., "No correction required".
He had always have a full measure of a trait that is a mark of a successful leader's determination.

Question 6

Direction: In the given question, a part of the sentence is printed in bold. Below the sentence alternatives to the bold part are given at (A), (B), (C) and (D) which may help improve the sentence. Choose the correct alternative. In case the given sentence is correct, your answer is (E), i.e., "No correction required".
Although my cousin invited me, I choose not to go to the reunion.

Question 7

Direction: In the following question, a statement divided into different segments is given. The first segment is fixed. Rearrange the other segments to form a coherent statement. If the sentence is already arranged or the correct sequence doesn't match any of the given sequences, mark (E) i.e. "None of the above" as your answer.
A poor start to/ has seen United slip 19 points behind (A)/ the hunt for the top-four place (B)/ the leaders, Liverpool, and fall off the pace in (C)/ the Premier League season (D)

Question 8

Direction: In the given question, a statement divided into different segments is given. The first segment is fixed, rearrange the other segments to form a coherent statement. If the sentence is already arranged or the correct sequence doesn't match any of the given sequence, mark (e).i.e. "None of the above" as your answer.
While there used to be a time when/ battling depression or visiting psychiatrists was (P)/ considered being equivalent to (Q)/ ‘going crazy’, the much-needed dialogue for (R)/ mental health is finally taking place (S)

Question 9

Direction: In the following question, a statement divided into different segments is given. The first segment is fixed. Rearrange the other segments to form a coherent statement. If the sentence is already arranged or the correct sequence doesn't match any of the given sequences, mark (E) i.e. "None of the above" as your answer.

If your data and research/ person creation and content roll-out process (A)/ you haven’t addressed, you’ll want to ask yourself to (B)/ suggest you have a new audience (C)/ some key questions before investing in the full buyer (D)

Question 10

Direction: In the given question, a statement divided into different segments is given. The first segment is fixed; rearrange the other segments to form a coherent statement. If the sentence is already arranged or the correct sequence doesn't match any of the given sequence, mark (E), i.e., "None of the above" as your answer.
Gandhi didn’t hesitate to withdraw/ in the midst of Partition’s mass frenzy (P)/ of Chauri Chaura when it gained momentum, (Q)/ the non-cooperation movement in the aftermath (R)/ and Nehru stood for secularism and scientific rationality (S).

Question 11

Direction: Read the given passage carefully and answer the questions that follow. 

VR was supposed to be a revolution, with companies like Oculus pioneering a whole new way for gamers and non-gamers alike to be immersed in digital environments — but that excitement has markedly cooled. The media has gone through several cycles of fawning, optimistic prognostication, and... wishful thinking? — but for all the hype we have very little consumer interest to show for it. Oculus sold off to Facebook and has become little more than a parlor trick Mark Zuckerberg shows off at every F8 event. As Ben Thompson recently noted, the bet on the company is an awkward fit for Facebook that strays from Zuckerberg’s strengths in several ways.

Oculus founder Palmer Luckey is now tooling around on right wing defence projects, while co-founder Brendan Iribe has just left the company amid rumors of future headsets being shelved. Several prominent studios have shut down or ceased VR efforts, including Viacom and AltspaceVR, and Microsoft is a steadfast “no” when it comes to dipping its toes in the water via the Xbox. Sony has boasted about sales of the PSVR hitting 3 million in two years, but there are 82 million PS4 units in the hands of consumers (and keep in mind that Microsoft sold 35 million Kinects but still discontinued the product). With cumbersome hardware, absurd PC requirements, and nearly no AAA titles to lure the curious into the world of VR, it’s becoming increasingly unlikely that we’ll see a major shift to virtual reality any time soon.

Also worth noting: if you’re looking to Magic Leap for a kind of bridge to the future with its AR efforts, don’t get too wound up. Brian Merchant’s excellent and detailed feature story for Gizmodo on the company’s struggles to get around the same hardware, software, and consumer adoption issues that plague VR make it clear there is no easy answer in this space.

In my opinion — as someone who watched this new generation of virtual reality emerge from the earliest days, and was one of its biggest fans — VR adoption will only happen when the barrier to entry is akin to slipping on a pair of sunglasses. Most people don’t want to wear a bulky headset, even in private, there’s no must have “killer app” for VR, and no one has made a simple plug-and-play option that lets a novice user engage casually. Everyone I know who’s tried a VR headset is blown away by the experience, but no one really wants to go deep on it except for what amounts to a rounding-error percentage of enthusiasts. Someone needs to break through with a seriously downsized and much more sophisticated offering... and the tech (nor the business incentive) is just not there. Apple has made a clear bet on augmented reality and Google already took a soft swing with VR that didn’t even get a mention at the company’s last press event, so don’t hold your breath for a white knight.

Source: https://theoutline.com
Which of the following statements can be correctly inferred from the passage?

I. VR headsets are really cheap and low quality which is why it’s not being adopted by the professionals.
II. VR as a business is thriving and every company is jumping on the bandwagon in a hurry.
III. VR adoption hasn’t been anywhere near what was previously expected and most companies are shying away from it.

Question 12

Direction: Read the given passage carefully and answer the questions that follow. 

VR was supposed to be a revolution, with companies like Oculus pioneering a whole new way for gamers and non-gamers alike to be immersed in digital environments — but that excitement has markedly cooled. The media has gone through several cycles of fawning, optimistic prognostication, and... wishful thinking? — but for all the hype we have very little consumer interest to show for it. Oculus sold off to Facebook and has become little more than a parlor trick Mark Zuckerberg shows off at every F8 event. As Ben Thompson recently noted, the bet on the company is an awkward fit for Facebook that strays from Zuckerberg’s strengths in several ways.

Oculus founder Palmer Luckey is now tooling around on right wing defence projects, while co-founder Brendan Iribe has just left the company amid rumors of future headsets being shelved. Several prominent studios have shut down or ceased VR efforts, including Viacom and AltspaceVR, and Microsoft is a steadfast “no” when it comes to dipping its toes in the water via the Xbox. Sony has boasted about sales of the PSVR hitting 3 million in two years, but there are 82 million PS4 units in the hands of consumers (and keep in mind that Microsoft sold 35 million Kinects but still discontinued the product). With cumbersome hardware, absurd PC requirements, and nearly no AAA titles to lure the curious into the world of VR, it’s becoming increasingly unlikely that we’ll see a major shift to virtual reality any time soon.

Also worth noting: if you’re looking to Magic Leap for a kind of bridge to the future with its AR efforts, don’t get too wound up. Brian Merchant’s excellent and detailed feature story for Gizmodo on the company’s struggles to get around the same hardware, software, and consumer adoption issues that plague VR make it clear there is no easy answer in this space.

In my opinion — as someone who watched this new generation of virtual reality emerge from the earliest days, and was one of its biggest fans — VR adoption will only happen when the barrier to entry is akin to slipping on a pair of sunglasses. Most people don’t want to wear a bulky headset, even in private, there’s no must have “killer app” for VR, and no one has made a simple plug-and-play option that lets a novice user engage casually. Everyone I know who’s tried a VR headset is blown away by the experience, but no one really wants to go deep on it except for what amounts to a rounding-error percentage of enthusiasts. Someone needs to break through with a seriously downsized and much more sophisticated offering... and the tech (nor the business incentive) is just not there. Apple has made a clear bet on augmented reality and Google already took a soft swing with VR that didn’t even get a mention at the company’s last press event, so don’t hold your breath for a white knight.

Source: https://theoutline.com
Which of the following statements is NOT true with respect to the passage?

Question 13

Direction: Read the given passage carefully and answer the questions that follow. 

VR was supposed to be a revolution, with companies like Oculus pioneering a whole new way for gamers and non-gamers alike to be immersed in digital environments — but that excitement has markedly cooled. The media has gone through several cycles of fawning, optimistic prognostication, and... wishful thinking? — but for all the hype we have very little consumer interest to show for it. Oculus sold off to Facebook and has become little more than a parlor trick Mark Zuckerberg shows off at every F8 event. As Ben Thompson recently noted, the bet on the company is an awkward fit for Facebook that strays from Zuckerberg’s strengths in several ways.

Oculus founder Palmer Luckey is now tooling around on right wing defence projects, while co-founder Brendan Iribe has just left the company amid rumors of future headsets being shelved. Several prominent studios have shut down or ceased VR efforts, including Viacom and AltspaceVR, and Microsoft is a steadfast “no” when it comes to dipping its toes in the water via the Xbox. Sony has boasted about sales of the PSVR hitting 3 million in two years, but there are 82 million PS4 units in the hands of consumers (and keep in mind that Microsoft sold 35 million Kinects but still discontinued the product). With cumbersome hardware, absurd PC requirements, and nearly no AAA titles to lure the curious into the world of VR, it’s becoming increasingly unlikely that we’ll see a major shift to virtual reality any time soon.

Also worth noting: if you’re looking to Magic Leap for a kind of bridge to the future with its AR efforts, don’t get too wound up. Brian Merchant’s excellent and detailed feature story for Gizmodo on the company’s struggles to get around the same hardware, software, and consumer adoption issues that plague VR make it clear there is no easy answer in this space.

In my opinion — as someone who watched this new generation of virtual reality emerge from the earliest days, and was one of its biggest fans — VR adoption will only happen when the barrier to entry is akin to slipping on a pair of sunglasses. Most people don’t want to wear a bulky headset, even in private, there’s no must have “killer app” for VR, and no one has made a simple plug-and-play option that lets a novice user engage casually. Everyone I know who’s tried a VR headset is blown away by the experience, but no one really wants to go deep on it except for what amounts to a rounding-error percentage of enthusiasts. Someone needs to break through with a seriously downsized and much more sophisticated offering... and the tech (nor the business incentive) is just not there. Apple has made a clear bet on augmented reality and Google already took a soft swing with VR that didn’t even get a mention at the company’s last press event, so don’t hold your breath for a white knight.

Source: https://theoutline.com
What is the main reason for VR adoption being very low among general public?

Question 14

Direction: Read the given passage carefully and answer the questions that follow. 

VR was supposed to be a revolution, with companies like Oculus pioneering a whole new way for gamers and non-gamers alike to be immersed in digital environments — but that excitement has markedly cooled. The media has gone through several cycles of fawning, optimistic prognostication, and... wishful thinking? — but for all the hype we have very little consumer interest to show for it. Oculus sold off to Facebook and has become little more than a parlor trick Mark Zuckerberg shows off at every F8 event. As Ben Thompson recently noted, the bet on the company is an awkward fit for Facebook that strays from Zuckerberg’s strengths in several ways.

Oculus founder Palmer Luckey is now tooling around on right wing defence projects, while co-founder Brendan Iribe has just left the company amid rumors of future headsets being shelved. Several prominent studios have shut down or ceased VR efforts, including Viacom and AltspaceVR, and Microsoft is a steadfast “no” when it comes to dipping its toes in the water via the Xbox. Sony has boasted about sales of the PSVR hitting 3 million in two years, but there are 82 million PS4 units in the hands of consumers (and keep in mind that Microsoft sold 35 million Kinects but still discontinued the product). With cumbersome hardware, absurd PC requirements, and nearly no AAA titles to lure the curious into the world of VR, it’s becoming increasingly unlikely that we’ll see a major shift to virtual reality any time soon.

Also worth noting: if you’re looking to Magic Leap for a kind of bridge to the future with its AR efforts, don’t get too wound up. Brian Merchant’s excellent and detailed feature story for Gizmodo on the company’s struggles to get around the same hardware, software, and consumer adoption issues that plague VR make it clear there is no easy answer in this space.

In my opinion — as someone who watched this new generation of virtual reality emerge from the earliest days, and was one of its biggest fans — VR adoption will only happen when the barrier to entry is akin to slipping on a pair of sunglasses. Most people don’t want to wear a bulky headset, even in private, there’s no must have “killer app” for VR, and no one has made a simple plug-and-play option that lets a novice user engage casually. Everyone I know who’s tried a VR headset is blown away by the experience, but no one really wants to go deep on it except for what amounts to a rounding-error percentage of enthusiasts. Someone needs to break through with a seriously downsized and much more sophisticated offering... and the tech (nor the business incentive) is just not there. Apple has made a clear bet on augmented reality and Google already took a soft swing with VR that didn’t even get a mention at the company’s last press event, so don’t hold your breath for a white knight.

Source: https://theoutline.com
Which of the following statements is the MOST SIMILAR in meaning to the given word?
PROGNOSTICATION

Question 15

Direction: Read the given passage carefully and answer the questions that follow. 

VR was supposed to be a revolution, with companies like Oculus pioneering a whole new way for gamers and non-gamers alike to be immersed in digital environments — but that excitement has markedly cooled. The media has gone through several cycles of fawning, optimistic prognostication, and... wishful thinking? — but for all the hype we have very little consumer interest to show for it. Oculus sold off to Facebook and has become little more than a parlor trick Mark Zuckerberg shows off at every F8 event. As Ben Thompson recently noted, the bet on the company is an awkward fit for Facebook that strays from Zuckerberg’s strengths in several ways.

Oculus founder Palmer Luckey is now tooling around on right wing defence projects, while co-founder Brendan Iribe has just left the company amid rumors of future headsets being shelved. Several prominent studios have shut down or ceased VR efforts, including Viacom and AltspaceVR, and Microsoft is a steadfast “no” when it comes to dipping its toes in the water via the Xbox. Sony has boasted about sales of the PSVR hitting 3 million in two years, but there are 82 million PS4 units in the hands of consumers (and keep in mind that Microsoft sold 35 million Kinects but still discontinued the product). With cumbersome hardware, absurd PC requirements, and nearly no AAA titles to lure the curious into the world of VR, it’s becoming increasingly unlikely that we’ll see a major shift to virtual reality any time soon.

Also worth noting: if you’re looking to Magic Leap for a kind of bridge to the future with its AR efforts, don’t get too wound up. Brian Merchant’s excellent and detailed feature story for Gizmodo on the company’s struggles to get around the same hardware, software, and consumer adoption issues that plague VR make it clear there is no easy answer in this space.

In my opinion — as someone who watched this new generation of virtual reality emerge from the earliest days, and was one of its biggest fans — VR adoption will only happen when the barrier to entry is akin to slipping on a pair of sunglasses. Most people don’t want to wear a bulky headset, even in private, there’s no must have “killer app” for VR, and no one has made a simple plug-and-play option that lets a novice user engage casually. Everyone I know who’s tried a VR headset is blown away by the experience, but no one really wants to go deep on it except for what amounts to a rounding-error percentage of enthusiasts. Someone needs to break through with a seriously downsized and much more sophisticated offering... and the tech (nor the business incentive) is just not there. Apple has made a clear bet on augmented reality and Google already took a soft swing with VR that didn’t even get a mention at the company’s last press event, so don’t hold your breath for a white knight.

Source: https://theoutline.com
Which of the following describes the tone of the passage?

Question 16

Direction: Read the sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number corresponding to that part will be your answer. If the given sentence is correct as it is, mark the answer as ‘No error’. Ignore the errors of punctuation if any.
The founders of the school sought (1)/ to invest their doctrines with the halo of tradition (2)/ by ascribing them to Pythagoras and Plato, and (3)/ there is no reason to accuse them for insincerity. (4)

Question 17

Direction: Read the sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number corresponding to that part will be your answer. If the given sentence is correct as it is, mark the answer as ‘No error’. Ignore the errors of punctuation if any.
The horse had especially (1)/ attracted their notice, (2)/ because it was the biggest and a (3)/ strangest creature they had ever seen. (4)

Question 18

Direction: Read the sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number corresponding to that part will be your answer. If the given sentence is correct as it is, mark the answer as No error. Ignore the errors of punctuation, if any.
He felt that his words, apart from (1)/ the meaning they conveyed, (2)/ are less audible than (3)/ the sound of his opponent's voice. (4)/ No error (5)

Question 19

Direction: Read the sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number corresponding to that part will be your answer. If the given sentence is correct as it is, mark the answer as No error. Ignore the errors of punctuation, if any.
All people need rest, even if they are made up of wood, (1)/ and as there is no night here (2)/ they select certain time (3)/ of the day in which to sleep or doze. (4)

Question 20

Direction: Read the sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number corresponding to that part will be your answer. If the given sentence is correct as it is, mark the answer as No error. Ignore the errors of punctuation, if any.
The most unique pile of more than a thousand (1)/ seal impressions featuring Greek gods, (2)/ symbols and erotica has been found in an underground closet (3)/ carved into the bedrock of the biblical town of Maresha. (4)
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