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CPO Tier II English Mock Test - Part 3

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Question 1

Read the following passage and fill in each blank with words chosen from options given. 

One day a father of a very wealthy family took his son on a trip to the country with the purpose of showing his son how the poor people live so he could be thankful for his (1). On their return from their trip, the father asked his son, “How was the trip?” “It was great, Dad.” “Did you see how poor people (2)?” the father asked. “Oh yeah,” said the son. “So what did you learn?” asked the father. The son answered, “I saw that we have (3) lanterns in our garden and they have the stars at night. We have a small piece of land to live on and they have fields that go beyond our (4). We have servants who serve us, but they serve others. We buy our food, but they grow theirs. We have walls around our property to protect us; they have friends to protect them.” With this, the boy’s father was (5). Then his son added, “Thanks dad for showing me how poor we are.”
...Read More
Select the most appropriate option to fill in blank No.1 

Question 2

Read the following passage and fill in each blank with words chosen from options given. 

One day a father of a very wealthy family took his son on a trip to the country with the purpose of showing his son how the poor people live so he could be thankful for his (1). On their return from their trip, the father asked his son, “How was the trip?” “It was great, Dad.” “Did you see how poor people (2)?” the father asked. “Oh yeah,” said the son. “So what did you learn?” asked the father. The son answered, “I saw that we have (3) lanterns in our garden and they have the stars at night. We have a small piece of land to live on and they have fields that go beyond our (4). We have servants who serve us, but they serve others. We buy our food, but they grow theirs. We have walls around our property to protect us; they have friends to protect them.” With this, the boy’s father was (5). Then his son added, “Thanks dad for showing me how poor we are.”
...Read More
Select the most appropriate option to fill in blank No.2

Question 3

Read the following passage and fill in each blank with words chosen from options given. 

One day a father of a very wealthy family took his son on a trip to the country with the purpose of showing his son how the poor people live so he could be thankful for his (1). On their return from their trip, the father asked his son, “How was the trip?” “It was great, Dad.” “Did you see how poor people (2)?” the father asked. “Oh yeah,” said the son. “So what did you learn?” asked the father. The son answered, “I saw that we have (3) lanterns in our garden and they have the stars at night. We have a small piece of land to live on and they have fields that go beyond our (4). We have servants who serve us, but they serve others. We buy our food, but they grow theirs. We have walls around our property to protect us; they have friends to protect them.” With this, the boy’s father was (5). Then his son added, “Thanks dad for showing me how poor we are.”
...Read More
Find the appropriate word in each case.

Question 4

Read the following passage and fill in each blank with words chosen from options given. 

One day a father of a very wealthy family took his son on a trip to the country with the purpose of showing his son how the poor people live so he could be thankful for his (1). On their return from their trip, the father asked his son, “How was the trip?” “It was great, Dad.” “Did you see how poor people (2)?” the father asked. “Oh yeah,” said the son. “So what did you learn?” asked the father. The son answered, “I saw that we have (3) lanterns in our garden and they have the stars at night. We have a small piece of land to live on and they have fields that go beyond our (4). We have servants who serve us, but they serve others. We buy our food, but they grow theirs. We have walls around our property to protect us; they have friends to protect them.” With this, the boy’s father was (5). Then his son added, “Thanks dad for showing me how poor we are.”
...Read More
Find the appropriate word in each case.

Question 5

Read the following passage and fill in each blank with words chosen from options given. 

One day a father of a very wealthy family took his son on a trip to the country with the purpose of showing his son how the poor people live so he could be thankful for his (1). On their return from their trip, the father asked his son, “How was the trip?” “It was great, Dad.” “Did you see how poor people (2)?” the father asked. “Oh yeah,” said the son. “So what did you learn?” asked the father. The son answered, “I saw that we have (3) lanterns in our garden and they have the stars at night. We have a small piece of land to live on and they have fields that go beyond our (4). We have servants who serve us, but they serve others. We buy our food, but they grow theirs. We have walls around our property to protect us; they have friends to protect them.” With this, the boy’s father was (5). Then his son added, “Thanks dad for showing me how poor we are.”
...Read More
Find the appropriate word in each case.

Question 6

In the sentence, identify the segment which contains the grammatical error.

The meeting which was held on the Town Hall was a great success. 

Question 7

In the sentence, identify the segment which contains the grammatical error. If the sentence has no error, then select 'No error'.

No man can become a great artist unless he apply himself continually to his art.

Question 8

In the sentence, identify the segment which contains the grammatical error.

Owing to the disturbing noise, the speaker was forced to adjourn the meetings. 

Question 9

Choose the most appropriate option to change the voice (active/passive) form of the given sentence.

While I was on holiday, my camera was stolen from my hotel room.

Question 10

Choose the most appropriate option to change the voice (active/passive) form of the given sentence.
By 1829, British goods worth seven crore rupees were being exported to India by Britain.

Question 11

Choose the most appropriate option to change the voice (active/passive) form of the given sentence.

Do all the necessary tests soon.

Question 12

Choose the most appropriate option to change the voice (active/passive) form of the given sentence.

She had locked the door before she left.

Question 13

Choose the most appropriate option to change the voice (active/passive) form of the given sentence.

Bravery and loyalty were rewarded by the king.

Question 14

Direction: Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

In the technological system of tomorrow-fast, fluid and self-regulating will deal with the flow of physical materials; men with the flow of information and insight. Machines will increasingly perform tasks. Machines and men both, instead of being concentrated in gigantic factories and factory cities, will be scattered across the globe, linked together by amazingly sensitive, near-instantaneous communications. Human work will move out of the factory and mass office into the community and the home.

Machines will be synchronized, as some already are, to the billionth of a second men will be de-synchronized. The factory whistle will vanish. Even the clock, “the key machine of the modern industrial age” as Lewis Mumford called it a generation ago, will lose some of its power over humans, as distinct from purely technological affairs. Simultaneously, the organization needed to control technology will shift from bureaucracy to Ad-hocracy, from permanence to transience, and from a concern with the present to a focus on the future.

In such a world, the most valued attributes of the industrial age become handicaps. The technology of tomorrow requires not millions of lightly lettered men, ready to work in unison at endlessly repetitive jobs, it requires not men who take orders in unblinking fashion, aware that the price of bread is mechanical submission to authority, but men who can make critical Judgments, who can weave their way through novel environments, who are quick to spot new relationships in the rapidly changing reality. It requires men who, in CP. Snow’s compelling terms, “have the future in their bones”.
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The technological system tomorrow will be marked by

Question 15

Direction: Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

In the technological system of tomorrow-fast, fluid and self-regulating will deal with the flow of physical materials; men with the flow of information and insight. Machines will increasingly perform tasks. Machines and men both, instead of being concentrated in gigantic factories and factory cities, will be scattered across the globe, linked together by amazingly sensitive, near-instantaneous communications. Human work will move out of the factory and mass office into the community and the home.

Machines will be synchronized, as some already are, to the billionth of a second men will be de-synchronized. The factory whistle will vanish. Even the clock, “the key machine of the modern industrial age” as Lewis Mumford called it a generation ago, will lose some of its power over humans, as distinct from purely technological affairs. Simultaneously, the organization needed to control technology will shift from bureaucracy to Ad-hocracy, from permanence to transience, and from a concern with the present to a focus on the future.

In such a world, the most valued attributes of the industrial age become handicaps. The technology of tomorrow requires not millions of lightly lettered men, ready to work in unison at endlessly repetitive jobs, it requires not men who take orders in unblinking fashion, aware that the price of bread is mechanical submission to authority, but men who can make critical Judgments, who can weave their way through novel environments, who are quick to spot new relationships in the rapidly changing reality. It requires men who, in CP. Snow’s compelling terms, “have the future in their bones”.
...Read More
The future man, according to this passage, must be

Question 16

Direction: Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

In the technological system of tomorrow-fast, fluid and self-regulating will deal with the flow of physical materials; men with the flow of information and insight. Machines will increasingly perform tasks. Machines and men both, instead of being concentrated in gigantic factories and factory cities, will be scattered across the globe, linked together by amazingly sensitive, near-instantaneous communications. Human work will move out of the factory and mass office into the community and the home.

Machines will be synchronized, as some already are, to the billionth of a second men will be de-synchronized. The factory whistle will vanish. Even the clock, “the key machine of the modern industrial age” as Lewis Mumford called it a generation ago, will lose some of its power over humans, as distinct from purely technological affairs. Simultaneously, the organization needed to control technology will shift from bureaucracy to Ad-hocracy, from permanence to transience, and from a concern with the present to a focus on the future.

In such a world, the most valued attributes of the industrial age become handicaps. The technology of tomorrow requires not millions of lightly lettered men, ready to work in unison at endlessly repetitive jobs, it requires not men who take orders in unblinking fashion, aware that the price of bread is mechanical submission to authority, but men who can make critical Judgments, who can weave their way through novel environments, who are quick to spot new relationships in the rapidly changing reality. It requires men who, in CP. Snow’s compelling terms, “have the future in their bones”.
...Read More
Near-instantaneous communication may be regarded as a symbol of

Question 17

Direction: Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

In the technological system of tomorrow-fast, fluid and self-regulating will deal with the flow of physical materials; men with the flow of information and insight. Machines will increasingly perform tasks. Machines and men both, instead of being concentrated in gigantic factories and factory cities, will be scattered across the globe, linked together by amazingly sensitive, near-instantaneous communications. Human work will move out of the factory and mass office into the community and the home.

Machines will be synchronized, as some already are, to the billionth of a second men will be de-synchronized. The factory whistle will vanish. Even the clock, “the key machine of the modern industrial age” as Lewis Mumford called it a generation ago, will lose some of its power over humans, as distinct from purely technological affairs. Simultaneously, the organization needed to control technology will shift from bureaucracy to Ad-hocracy, from permanence to transience, and from a concern with the present to a focus on the future.

In such a world, the most valued attributes of the industrial age become handicaps. The technology of tomorrow requires not millions of lightly lettered men, ready to work in unison at endlessly repetitive jobs, it requires not men who take orders in unblinking fashion, aware that the price of bread is mechanical submission to authority, but men who can make critical Judgments, who can weave their way through novel environments, who are quick to spot new relationships in the rapidly changing reality. It requires men who, in CP. Snow’s compelling terms, “have the future in their bones”.
...Read More
If a person believes that the price of bread is mechanical submission to authority, he is

Question 18

Direction: Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

In the technological system of tomorrow-fast, fluid and self-regulating will deal with the flow of physical materials; men with the flow of information and insight. Machines will increasingly perform tasks. Machines and men both, instead of being concentrated in gigantic factories and factory cities, will be scattered across the globe, linked together by amazingly sensitive, near-instantaneous communications. Human work will move out of the factory and mass office into the community and the home.

Machines will be synchronized, as some already are, to the billionth of a second men will be de-synchronized. The factory whistle will vanish. Even the clock, “the key machine of the modern industrial age” as Lewis Mumford called it a generation ago, will lose some of its power over humans, as distinct from purely technological affairs. Simultaneously, the organization needed to control technology will shift from bureaucracy to Ad-hocracy, from permanence to transience, and from a concern with the present to a focus on the future.

In such a world, the most valued attributes of the industrial age become handicaps. The technology of tomorrow requires not millions of lightly lettered men, ready to work in unison at endlessly repetitive jobs, it requires not men who take orders in unblinking fashion, aware that the price of bread is mechanical submission to authority, but men who can make critical Judgments, who can weave their way through novel environments, who are quick to spot new relationships in the rapidly changing reality. It requires men who, in CP. Snow’s compelling terms, “have the future in their bones”.
...Read More
The type of society which the author has mentioned makes a plea for

Question 19

Select the incorrectly spelt word.

Question 20

Select the INCORRECTLY spelt word.

Question 21

Select the incorrectly spelt word.

Question 22

Identify the best way to improve the underlined part of the given sentence. If there is no improvement required, select ‘no Improvement’.

He lifted the baby onto the cradle.

Question 23

Identify the best way to improve the underlined part of the given sentence. If there is no improvement required, select ‘no Improvement’.

I will complete this work within a month.

Question 24

Improve the bracketed part of the sentence.
She (got the better) of her opponent in chess.

Question 25

Improve the bracketed part of the sentence.
He is (neither ashamed) nor sorry for his deeds.

Question 26

Select the most appropriate option to substitute the underlined segment in the given sentence. If no substitution is required, select No improvement.

The rise and fall have caused great damage to the bridge.

Question 27

Choose the most appropriate option to change the voice (active/passive) form of the given sentence.

The enemies have destroyed the 'Ajooba' town.

Question 28

Choose the most appropriate option to change the voice (active/passive) form of the given sentence.

Rohit had written an essay on 'Pollution'.

Question 29

Choose the most appropriate option to change the voice (active/passive) form of the given sentence.

He had already torn the pages of the book.

Question 30

In the following question, out of the five alternatives, select the word similar in meaning to the given word/phrase.
Solemn religious acts

Question 31

Select the word which means the same as the group of words given.

A rough, violent, troublesome person

Question 32

Select the word which means the same as the group of words given.

A brave, noble-minded or chivalrous man

Question 33

Given below are four jumbled sentences. Pick the option that gives their correct order.
P. It is by no means a biological evolution, but it is a cultural one. That brilliant sequence of cultural peaks can most appropriately be termed the ascent of man.
Q. Biological evolution has not fitted man to any specific environment. His imagination, his reason, his emotional subtlety, and toughness, makes it possible for him not to accept the environment but to change.
R. And that series of inventions by which man from age by age has reshaped his environment is a different kind of evolution.
S. Among the multitude of animals which scamper, burrow, swim around us he is the only one who is not locked into his environment.

Question 34

Given below are four jumbled sentences. Pick the option that gives their correct order.
P. Not only does he have a memory but he is able to think and reason.

Q. Growing up means not only getting larger, but also using our sense and our brain is to become more aware of things around us. In this, man differs from all other animals.

R. Before we spray our roadside plants or turn sewage into our rivers, we should pause to think what the results of our action are likely to do.

S. This is to say, he is able to plan what he is going to do in the light of his experience before he does it.

Question 35

Given below are four jumbled sentences. Pick the option that gives their correct order.
P. The leading god fought the monster, killed it, and chopped its body into two halves.

Q. All the land was covered by the ocean. A terrible monster prevented the gods from separating the land from the water.

R. The god made the sky out of the upper part of the body and ornamented it with stars.

S. The god created the Earth from the lower part, grew plants on it, and populated it with animals.

Question 36

Direction: In the given question, the first and the last parts of the passage/sentence are numbered (1) and (6). The rest of the passage/sentence is split into four parts and named P, Q, R and S. These four parts are not given in their proper order. Read the sentences and find out which of the four combinations is correct and mark the respective option.
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1) Once upon a time an ant lived on the bank of a river.
P. The dove saw the ant struggling in water in a helpless condition.
Q. AU its efforts to come up failed.
R. One day it suddenly slipped into water.
S. A dove lived in the tree on the bank not far from the spot.
6) She was touched.

Question 37

Given below are four jumbled sentences. Pick the option that gives the correct order.
P. Most people bore the shock bravely.

Q. The rising gale fanned the smoldering fire even more.

R. Everyone was told to be ready to quit the ship because of the fire on board.

S. Smoke oozed up between the planks and flames broke out here and there.

Question 38

Given below are four jumbled sentences. Pick the option that gives their correct order.
P. But despite the Jack refused to work.

Q. They were very poor so the mother asked him to find work.

R. At last, she turned him out of the house.

S. There was a boy named Jack who lived with his mother.

Question 39

Direction: Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives. 

The originator of the theory of evolution Charles Darwin, an eminent scientist and writer of “The Origin of Species’ and “The Descent of Man”, came from a distinguished family. His grandfather Erasmus Darwin, was an eminent physician, an inventor and a competent author with liberal views. In one of his works, he had even suggested the idea of evolution. Charles' grandfather on his mother’s side was Josiah Wedgwood, the industrialist who established the world famous pottery works.

Because his father wished him to follow the family profession of medicine, he sent Charles to a classical secondary school and then to medical school at Edinburgh University. Charles did poorly at both places, because he was less interested in these studies than in several hobbies that he had cultivated. He joined a club of young zoologists and made several expeditions along the shores of England to study marine life. He pursued books on travel, natural philosophy, geology, botany and zoology. The beginning of his thinking on evolution may possibly be traced to his reading of scientist Lamarck and to his grandfather’s journal which suggested this idea.

As a last hope for a serious and respectable career, Charles’s family thought he might become a clergyman, and he was sent to Christ College. But he joined a group or young sportsmen and gave attention to the riches and marksmanship. At this point he had accepted the position as a naturalist on the ship Beagle which was to make an exploratory around the world trip under Captain Fitzory.
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Why did Charles accept the offer to work on ship ‘Beagle’?

Question 40

Direction: Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives. 

The originator of the theory of evolution Charles Darwin, an eminent scientist and writer of “The Origin of Species’ and “The Descent of Man”, came from a distinguished family. His grandfather Erasmus Darwin, was an eminent physician, an inventor and a competent author with liberal views. In one of his works, he had even suggested the idea of evolution. Charles' grandfather on his mother’s side was Josiah Wedgwood, the industrialist who established the world famous pottery works.

Because his father wished him to follow the family profession of medicine, he sent Charles to a classical secondary school and then to medical school at Edinburgh University. Charles did poorly at both places, because he was less interested in these studies than in several hobbies that he had cultivated. He joined a club of young zoologists and made several expeditions along the shores of England to study marine life. He pursued books on travel, natural philosophy, geology, botany and zoology. The beginning of his thinking on evolution may possibly be traced to his reading of scientist Lamarck and to his grandfather’s journal which suggested this idea.

As a last hope for a serious and respectable career, Charles’s family thought he might become a clergyman, and he was sent to Christ College. But he joined a group or young sportsmen and gave attention to the riches and marksmanship. At this point he had accepted the position as a naturalist on the ship Beagle which was to make an exploratory around the world trip under Captain Fitzory.
...Read More
Charles may have derived the idea of evolution from

Question 41

Direction: Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives. 

The originator of the theory of evolution Charles Darwin, an eminent scientist and writer of “The Origin of Species’ and “The Descent of Man”, came from a distinguished family. His grandfather Erasmus Darwin, was an eminent physician, an inventor and a competent author with liberal views. In one of his works, he had even suggested the idea of evolution. Charles' grandfather on his mother’s side was Josiah Wedgwood, the industrialist who established the world famous pottery works.

Because his father wished him to follow the family profession of medicine, he sent Charles to a classical secondary school and then to medical school at Edinburgh University. Charles did poorly at both places, because he was less interested in these studies than in several hobbies that he had cultivated. He joined a club of young zoologists and made several expeditions along the shores of England to study marine life. He pursued books on travel, natural philosophy, geology, botany and zoology. The beginning of his thinking on evolution may possibly be traced to his reading of scientist Lamarck and to his grandfather’s journal which suggested this idea.

As a last hope for a serious and respectable career, Charles’s family thought he might become a clergyman, and he was sent to Christ College. But he joined a group or young sportsmen and gave attention to the riches and marksmanship. At this point he had accepted the position as a naturalist on the ship Beagle which was to make an exploratory around the world trip under Captain Fitzory.
...Read More
Which of the following is NOT TRUE about Erasmus?

Question 42

Direction: Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives. 

The originator of the theory of evolution Charles Darwin, an eminent scientist and writer of “The Origin of Species’ and “The Descent of Man”, came from a distinguished family. His grandfather Erasmus Darwin, was an eminent physician, an inventor and a competent author with liberal views. In one of his works, he had even suggested the idea of evolution. Charles' grandfather on his mother’s side was Josiah Wedgwood, the industrialist who established the world famous pottery works.

Because his father wished him to follow the family profession of medicine, he sent Charles to a classical secondary school and then to medical school at Edinburgh University. Charles did poorly at both places, because he was less interested in these studies than in several hobbies that he had cultivated. He joined a club of young zoologists and made several expeditions along the shores of England to study marine life. He pursued books on travel, natural philosophy, geology, botany and zoology. The beginning of his thinking on evolution may possibly be traced to his reading of scientist Lamarck and to his grandfather’s journal which suggested this idea.

As a last hope for a serious and respectable career, Charles’s family thought he might become a clergyman, and he was sent to Christ College. But he joined a group or young sportsmen and gave attention to the riches and marksmanship. At this point he had accepted the position as a naturalist on the ship Beagle which was to make an exploratory around the world trip under Captain Fitzory.
...Read More
Which of the following statements is TRUE in the context of the passage?

Question 43

Direction: Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives. 

The originator of the theory of evolution Charles Darwin, an eminent scientist and writer of “The Origin of Species’ and “The Descent of Man”, came from a distinguished family. His grandfather Erasmus Darwin, was an eminent physician, an inventor and a competent author with liberal views. In one of his works, he had even suggested the idea of evolution. Charles' grandfather on his mother’s side was Josiah Wedgwood, the industrialist who established the world famous pottery works.

Because his father wished him to follow the family profession of medicine, he sent Charles to a classical secondary school and then to medical school at Edinburgh University. Charles did poorly at both places, because he was less interested in these studies than in several hobbies that he had cultivated. He joined a club of young zoologists and made several expeditions along the shores of England to study marine life. He pursued books on travel, natural philosophy, geology, botany and zoology. The beginning of his thinking on evolution may possibly be traced to his reading of scientist Lamarck and to his grandfather’s journal which suggested this idea.

As a last hope for a serious and respectable career, Charles’s family thought he might become a clergyman, and he was sent to Christ College. But he joined a group or young sportsmen and gave attention to the riches and marksmanship. At this point he had accepted the position as a naturalist on the ship Beagle which was to make an exploratory around the world trip under Captain Fitzory.
...Read More
It appears from the passage that Charles’s interests were in all the fields given below except

Question 44

Improve the bold part of the sentence.
Neha or Ravi is willing to go to the market.

Question 45

Identify the best way to improve the underlined part of the given sentence. If there is no improvement required, select ‘no Improvement’.

He went to Mumbai in lieu of a job.

Question 46

Identify the best way to improve the underlined part of the given sentence. If there is no improvement required, select ‘no Improvement’.

You will not pass until you don't write properly.

Question 47

Which one of the following can be used as a substitute for the words written in capital letters in the sentence, "My friend sold her diamond ring FOR A SONG."?

Question 48

Choose the most appropriate option to change the narration (direct/indirect) of the given sentence.

He asked me what the time was.

Question 49

Choose the most appropriate option to change the narration (direct/indirect) of the given sentence.

Sania asked me if I could see her the next day.

Question 50

Choose the most appropriate option to change the narration (direct/indirect) of the given sentence.

He said, “Has Arvind spent all the money?”
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Neha GoyalNeha GoyalMember since Mar 2017
Neha is a Community Manager, helping students in preparation for SSC and State exams. Her main focus is to generate quality content and sending it to thousands of students through Gradeup. Neha has worked in Tata Consultancy Services for a year, but her keen interest in e-learning and teaching have dragged her into the education sector. Pursuing her career in Gradeup since March 2017, she has helped students by solving their queries through e-portal 'Gradeup'. Her email address is [email protected]
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