Which Court is Called a Court of Record?

By Aarna Tiwari|Updated : July 19th, 2022

The Supreme Court and High Courts are called a Court of Record in India. To function as a Court of Record, the powers are vested with the Supreme Court and High Courts under Article 129 and Article 215 of the Indian Constitution, respectively. 

Which Courts are Court of Record in India?

A Court of Record is a Court whose Acts and proceedings are enrolled for perpetual memory and testimony and whose records can be used with high authority. The truth of the Court of Record cannot be questioned. Under the Constitution of India, the Supreme Court and High Courts are the Court of Record. The Court of Record has the power to punish for contempt of court with simple imprisonment for a term up to six months, a fine, or both.

But the powers of the contempt of the Supreme Court and High Courts are independent of the Court of Contempt Act, 1971. 

Article 129 and Article 215 of the Indian Constitution states that:

  • Article 129: The Supreme Court shall be a court of record and shall have all the powers of such a court, including the power to punish for contempt of itself.
  • Article 215: Every High Court shall be a court of record and shall have all the powers of such a court, including the power to punish for contempt of itself.

Related Questions:-

Comments

write a comment

FAQs on Which Court is Called a Court of Record?

  • The Supreme Court and High Courts are called the Court of Record in India. Their judgements, proceedings and acts are recorded for perpetual memory and testimony and are admitted to be of evidentiary value and cannot be questioned when produced before any court.

  • The High Court is called the Court of Record. It means that the judgements made by the High Court are preserved as a record to be referred to by its courts in future cases. The laws laid down by the High Court are binding on all subordinate courts in the concerned State.

Follow us for latest updates