What is the role of the press in the freedom struggle?

By Ritesh|Updated : September 7th, 2022

Indian printing is credited to James Augustus Hickey. He established the Bengal Gazette in 1780. However, because it was critical of the British government, it was seized in 1872. The government took responsibility as the number of newspapers increased. She, therefore, took several steps to stifle the press.

Role of the Press in the Freedom Struggle

  • The independence struggle benefited greatly from the work of the press.
  • They contributed to the spread of revolutionary ideals that fueled opposition to the British government.
  • Press freedom was crucial because it was a potent tool for the spread of political ideologies.
  • These newspapers' principal objective was to serve the public, not to gain money.
  • Despite this, these publications reached a large audience and sparked the growing push for public libraries.
  • This movement did not just affect cities and towns; these journals also reached isolated villages, where every editorial and article was carefully studied and discussed in neighborhood libraries.
  • Political engagement and education were thus made possible by libraries.
  • Newspapers also aided in raising knowledge of the draconian measures taken by the colonial authority, which stoked protests and acts of revolt against the British.
  • In other words, the press kept them burning despite British efforts to put out the flames of the Indian independence movement.
  • Several oppressive laws were enacted due to the Swadeshi and Boycott campaigns and the growth of militant nationalist attitudes.
  • Not only was freedom of speech severely curtailed during the First and Second World Wars, but also political and human rights.

Summary:

What is the role of the press in the freedom struggle?

The role of the press in the freedom struggle, including newspapers, contributed to the public understanding of the colonial government's severe policies, which stoked greater unrest and acts of revolution against the British. This movement did not just affect cities and towns; these journals also reached isolated villages, where every editorial and article was carefully studied and discussed in neighborhood libraries.

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