What is the Lee Commission?

By Ritesh|Updated : September 3rd, 2022

The Lee Commission was a body made by the British Government in 1923 under the chairmanship of Lord Lee of Fareham. Its purpose was to study the racial composition of the superior public service of the government of India. In 1924, All-India Services divided the commission into two groups.

About Lee Commission

  • The first group included higher education (IES), agriculture, veterinary, engineering, and health services.
  • The second group included services operating in reserved areas such as the Indian Civil Service, the Indian Police Service, the Indian Service of Engineers, and the Indian Forest Service.
  • The Montagu-Chelmsford reforms suggested that about one-third of all appointments to senior posts should go to Indians, and the Islington Commission recommended 25 percent of posts for Indians.
  • Simultaneous trials were held in London and New Delhi in 1922.
  • Finally, the commission had equal numbers of Indian and British members, insisting that 40 percent of Indians be directly recruited, 40 percent of future participants be British, and about 20 percent of Indians promoted from local service.
  • In 1947, the commission had more than half of the services of about 1,000 members who were Indians holding high posts.
  • Presently, the commission is known as the Union Public Service Commission.

Summary:

What is the Lee Commission?

Lee Commission was made by the British Government in 1923 under the chairmanship of Lord Lee of Fareham. The reason was to learn the racial composition of the superior public service of the Indian government.

Comments

write a comment

Featured Articles

Follow us for latest updates