What is the 1st Amendment of the Indian Constitution?

By Arpit Kumar Jain|Updated : August 11th, 2022

The 1st amendment of the Indian constitution was officially named Constitution Act. Jawaharlal Nehru, who was India's prime minister at the time, made the motion on May 10, 1951, and Parliament passed it on June 18, 1951. It introduced several revisions to the Indian Constitution's Fundamental Rights clauses. It gave ways to limit freedom of speech and expression, supported measures to abolish zamindari, and made it clear that the right to equality does not preclude the passing of laws that give "particular consideration" to society's weaker sections.

1st Amendment of the Indian Constitution

In the 1st amendment of the Indian constitution, a restriction on Article 19(1)(a) of the Indian Constitution against "Abuse of Freedom of Speech and Expression" was enacted by the Jawaharlal Nehru administration in 1951. Furthermore, Article 19(1)(g) of the Constitution of India grants citizens of India the freedom to engage in any profession or carry on any occupation, trade, or business, subject to any reasonable limitations that the State's laws may apply "In the Interests of the General Public".

In addition, a new Article 31B with the retroactive application was added to confirm 13 zamindari abolition-related laws. Also, the State should promote with special consideration the educational and economic interests of the weaker sectors of the population and safeguard them from social injustice, as stated in Article 46 as a “Directive Principle of State Policy”.

A restriction was added to Article 19(1)(a) of the Indian Constitution in 1951 by the administration to prevent "Abuse of Freedom of Article 15(3)” was appropriately expanded so that any special provisions the state may make for the social, economic, or educational advancement of any backward class of people may not be contested based on discrimination.

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  • Officially known as the Constitution Act, the 1st amendment to the Indian Constitution. It suggested ways to restrict free speech and expression, backed efforts to do away with zamindari, and made it plain that the principle of equality does not prevent lawmakers from establishing legislation that provides "special regard" to society's weaker groups.

  • To prevent "Abuse of Freedom of Article 15(3)," a restriction was added to Article 19(1)(a) of the Indian Constitution in 1951 by the administration. As a result, any special provisions the state may make for the social, economic, or educational advancement of any backward class of people may not be contested based on discrimination.

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