What is a Displacement Reaction? Give an Example

By K Balaji|Updated : November 9th, 2022

Displacement reaction is where and highly reactant species pushes out or displaces a less reactive element from the solution. An example is where zinc removes the iron ions from the iron sulfate solution.

Displacement Reaction

  • A displacement reaction is a chemical process in which a highly reactive species (or element) forces a less reactive element out of its solution.
  • Zinc, for example, takes iron ions out of iron sulphate solution.
  • When iron and copper nitrate solution interact, iron is liberated as iron sulphate solution.
  • A substitution reaction is another name for a displacement reaction.

When an atom or group of atoms in a molecule are replaced by another atom, this is referred to as a displacement reaction. For instance, copper metal is displaced when iron is added to a solution of copper sulphate.

A + B-C → A-C + B

The above equation exists when A is more reactive than B.

A and B have to be either:

  • Halogens where C indicates a cation.
  • Different metals wherein C indicates an anion.

The chemical equation of a displacement reaction:

  • As an illustration, one of the displacement reactions is the reaction between iron and copper sulphate, which yields iron sulphate.
  • Copper is substituted because iron is in this condition far more reactive than copper.

Fe(s) + CuSO4 (aq) → FeSO4 (aq) + Cu(s)

Summary:-

What is a Displacement Reaction? Give an Example

When a highly reactive species drives out or displaces a less reactive element from the solution, this is referred to as a displacement reaction. As an illustration, consider how zinc can remove the iron ions from an iron sulphate solution.

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