What are the objectives of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights?

By Ritesh|Updated : September 3rd, 2022

The first normative response of the world community at the time of the Second World War was the objectives of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. "Disregard and scorn for human rights have led to barbaric crimes that have offended the conscience of mankind," it stated.

As a result, the following principles were codified in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights:

  • It highlighted that "the foundation of freedom, justice, and peace in the world is an acknowledgment of the inherent dignity and the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family.
  • It also emphasized the significance of having a shared understanding of the human rights and freedoms entrenched in the UN charter to fulfill the pledge.

Overview of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights:

  • The 30 articles that make up the UDHR describe a person's "basic rights and fundamental freedoms."
  • All people, regardless of their color, religion, or nationality, can use it.
  • It served as a major catalyst for creating international human rights law and the foundation for the 1966-completed and 1976-enacted International Bill of Human Rights.
  • The Universal Human Rights Declaration does not have legal force, but its principles have been developed and incorporated into subsequent international agreements, regional human rights instruments, and state legal frameworks.
  • All 193 members of the UDHR have ratified at least one of its nine legally binding treaties.

Summary:

What are the objectives of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights?

It is evident in the preamble that the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) was the first normative response of the international community at the time to the awful experiences it had during the Second World War.

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