What are fluvial erosional landforms?

By Ritesh|Updated : September 6th, 2022

Landforms produced by the movement and energy of rivers and streams are known as fluvial erosional landforms. The fluvial process forms two distinct landforms, and both fluvial erosion and fluvial depositional landforms are involved.

Characteristics of Fluvial Erosional Landforms

Gorges, canyons, waterfalls, rapids, and river capture are examples of eroded fluvial landforms.

Natural levees, floodplains, oxbow lakes, deltas, and other fluvial depositional landforms.

  • Landforms known as fluvial erosional landforms are the result of river erosion. Various aspects of fluvial erosive action include:
  • Rocks are eroded by the force of flowing water, which is hydration.
  • Corrosion is the chemical process that causes weathering.
  • Rocks are worn down by corrosion or abrasion caused by a heavy river load striking them.
  • Vertical erosion, known as "downcutting," refers to the erosion of a stream's bed (downcutting leads to valley deepening).
  • The eroding of a stream's side walls is known as lateral erosion (which leads to valley widening).
  • Headward erosion is the erosion of a stream channel's origin, which moves back from the flow direction and lengthens the stream channel.

Attrition: River load particles impacting, colliding, and disintegrating.

Summary:

What are fluvial erosional landforms?

Fluvial erosional landforms are those created by the motion and energy of rivers and streams, and the fluvial process creates two individual landforms.

  • It involves both fluvial erosion and fluvial depositional landforms.
  • Many fluvial erosion landforms include gorges, canyons, waterfalls, rapids, and river capture.
  • Levees, floodplains, lakes, deltas and other river depositional landforms are naturally occurring.

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