The Ratio of Linear Strain to Lateral Strain is Called

The material tends to compress when stretched in the opposite direction from the direction that the force was applied, and vice versa. The Poisson's ratio is used to quantify this phenomenon. Stretching a rubber band, for instance, causes it to become thinner.

Answer - The ratio of linear strain to lateral strain is called Poisson’s ratio.

It will flatten in the centre. If the rubber is dragged longitudinally, it tends to get compressed laterally if the initial length and breadth are considered as L and B, respectively. Simply put, the length has increased by an amount dL and the breadth by an amount of dB. The strain is determined by dividing the original dimension by the new dimension (length, breadth, area, etc.). The Poisson's ratio value for the majority of materials falls between 0 and 0.5.

In the direction of the stretching force, it is the proportion of longitudinal extension strain to transverse contraction strain. With the application of force to a body, stress and strain relationship may be produced.

  • Poisson's ratio is positive for tensile deformation.
  • It is negative for compressive deformation.

Summary:

The Ratio of Linear Strain to Lateral Strain is Called

The ratio of linear strain to lateral strain is called Poisson’s ratio. The transverse contraction strain to longitudinal extension strain ratio in the direction of the stretching force is known as Poisson's ratio.

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