Who was the Mughal Emperor who Granted Diwani of Bengal, Bihar, and Orissa to the East India Company in 1765?

By Shivank Goel|Updated : September 5th, 2022

Mughal Emperor Shah Alam II granted Diwani of Bengal, Bihar, and Orissa to the East India Company. After the Battle of Buxar, the Treaty of Allahabad was signed in 1765 by the emperor Shah Alam II and Robert Clive. The sign of the treaty gave the Diwani rights of the states of Bengal, Bihar, and Orissa to the East India Company. After this, the status of tax exemption was also restored for the East India Company.

With the signing of the Allahabad Treaty and the power of the Diwani rights in hand, the East India Company's trade in India increased substantially. Moreover, the Company used the revenue collected from India itself to trade for Indian goods. As a result, the influx of gold and silver from Britain for the purpose of trade also decreased.

Mughal Emperor who Granted Diwani Rights to the East India Company

The Diwani rights were given to the East India Company after the Treaty of Allahabad was signed by the Mughal Emperor Shah Alam II and Robert Clive. After the treaty, the involvement of the East India Company in trade in India grew. After being defeated in the Battle of Buxar, the emperor also sought the protection of the British through the Treaty of Allahabad.

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  • After being defeated in the Battle of Buxar, the Mughal Emperor Shah Alam II signed the Treaty of Allahabad with Robert Clive to grant the Diwani rights of Bengal, Bihar, and Orissa to the East India Company.

  • The Mughal Emperor Shah Alam II gave the Diwani rights for the states of Bengal, Bihar, and Orissa to the East India Company in 1765, after being defeated in the Battle of Buxar.

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