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SSC: Reading Comprehension Quiz: 18.07.2021

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Question 1

Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow.

A great water scarcity looms over India; by 2025 Indians will get just over half the water they get today. This grave problem has a simple solution. Catch the rain as it falls, and the water crisis will disappear. However, about 80 per cent of India’s rainfall buckets down during the three months of the monsoons. As yet, no government programmer has discovered how to store this water.

‘Dying Wisdom, a seven-year countryside study by Delhi’s Centre for Science and Environment, reveals that ruins of amazing ancient technologies survive in every comer of India. Drip-irrigation systems of bamboo pipes in Meghalaya; kunds’, underground tanks in Rajasthan; ‘pynes’, water channels built by tribals in Bihar; and thousands of open-water bodies down south are all superb examples of rain water harvesting systems. Even today, tanks called ‘ens’ in Tamil Nadu water one-third of the state’s irrigated area. Unfortunately, governmental planners mostly refuse to acknowledge the potential of these low-cost systems, concentrating on costly dams and canals.

Few cities have lost touch with their ecological traditions as fast—and with as damaging results-as Bangalore. Only 17 of its water bodies struggle to survive in a city where once 200 lakes, ponds and wetlands cooled the city and recharged its ground water. The threats continue unabated as the relentless march of urbanization shows no sign of stopping.

‘This grave problem’ in the passage refers to

Question 2

Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow.

A great water scarcity looms over India; by 2025 Indians will get just over half the water they get today. This grave problem has a simple solution. Catch the rain as it falls, and the water crisis will disappear. However, about 80 per cent of India’s rainfall buckets down during the three months of the monsoons. As yet, no government programmer has discovered how to store this water.

‘Dying Wisdom, a seven-year countryside study by Delhi’s Centre for Science and Environment, reveals that ruins of amazing ancient technologies survive in every comer of India. Drip-irrigation systems of bamboo pipes in Meghalaya; kunds’, underground tanks in Rajasthan; ‘pynes’, water channels built by tribals in Bihar; and thousands of open-water bodies down south are all superb examples of rain water harvesting systems. Even today, tanks called ‘ens’ in Tamil Nadu water one-third of the state’s irrigated area. Unfortunately, governmental planners mostly refuse to acknowledge the potential of these low-cost systems, concentrating on costly dams and canals.

Few cities have lost touch with their ecological traditions as fast—and with as damaging results-as Bangalore. Only 17 of its water bodies struggle to survive in a city where once 200 lakes, ponds and wetlands cooled the city and recharged its ground water. The threats continue unabated as the relentless march of urbanization shows no sign of stopping.

What, according to the passage, is the primary reason for the water shortage?

Question 3

Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow.

A great water scarcity looms over India; by 2025 Indians will get just over half the water they get today. This grave problem has a simple solution. Catch the rain as it falls, and the water crisis will disappear. However, about 80 per cent of India’s rainfall buckets down during the three months of the monsoons. As yet, no government programmer has discovered how to store this water.

‘Dying Wisdom, a seven-year countryside study by Delhi’s Centre for Science and Environment, reveals that ruins of amazing ancient technologies survive in every comer of India. Drip-irrigation systems of bamboo pipes in Meghalaya; kunds’, underground tanks in Rajasthan; ‘pynes’, water channels built by tribals in Bihar; and thousands of open-water bodies down south are all superb examples of rain water harvesting systems. Even today, tanks called ‘ens’ in Tamil Nadu water one-third of the state’s irrigated area. Unfortunately, governmental planners mostly refuse to acknowledge the potential of these low-cost systems, concentrating on costly dams and canals.

Few cities have lost touch with their ecological traditions as fast—and with as damaging results-as Bangalore. Only 17 of its water bodies struggle to survive in a city where once 200 lakes, ponds and wetlands cooled the city and recharged its ground water. The threats continue unabated as the relentless march of urbanization shows no sign of stopping.

Which State uses bamboo pipes for the drip irrigation system?

Question 4

Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow.

A great water scarcity looms over India; by 2025 Indians will get just over half the water they get today. This grave problem has a simple solution. Catch the rain as it falls, and the water crisis will disappear. However, about 80 per cent of India’s rainfall buckets down during the three months of the monsoons. As yet, no government programmer has discovered how to store this water.

‘Dying Wisdom, a seven-year countryside study by Delhi’s Centre for Science and Environment, reveals that ruins of amazing ancient technologies survive in every comer of India. Drip-irrigation systems of bamboo pipes in Meghalaya; kunds’, underground tanks in Rajasthan; ‘pynes’, water channels built by tribals in Bihar; and thousands of open-water bodies down south are all superb examples of rain water harvesting systems. Even today, tanks called ‘ens’ in Tamil Nadu water one-third of the state’s irrigated area. Unfortunately, governmental planners mostly refuse to acknowledge the potential of these low-cost systems, concentrating on costly dams and canals.

Few cities have lost touch with their ecological traditions as fast—and with as damaging results-as Bangalore. Only 17 of its water bodies struggle to survive in a city where once 200 lakes, ponds and wetlands cooled the city and recharged its ground water. The threats continue unabated as the relentless march of urbanization shows no sign of stopping.

Which of the following is not a low cost technology in water usage?

Question 5

Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow.

A great water scarcity looms over India; by 2025 Indians will get just over half the water they get today. This grave problem has a simple solution. Catch the rain as it falls, and the water crisis will disappear. However, about 80 per cent of India’s rainfall buckets down during the three months of the monsoons. As yet, no government programmer has discovered how to store this water.

‘Dying Wisdom, a seven-year countryside study by Delhi’s Centre for Science and Environment, reveals that ruins of amazing ancient technologies survive in every comer of India. Drip-irrigation systems of bamboo pipes in Meghalaya; kunds’, underground tanks in Rajasthan; ‘pynes’, water channels built by tribals in Bihar; and thousands of open-water bodies down south are all superb examples of rain water harvesting systems. Even today, tanks called ‘ens’ in Tamil Nadu water one-third of the state’s irrigated area. Unfortunately, governmental planners mostly refuse to acknowledge the potential of these low-cost systems, concentrating on costly dams and canals.

Few cities have lost touch with their ecological traditions as fast—and with as damaging results-as Bangalore. Only 17 of its water bodies struggle to survive in a city where once 200 lakes, ponds and wetlands cooled the city and recharged its ground water. The threats continue unabated as the relentless march of urbanization shows no sign of stopping.

The people in ancient India had amazing technology to harvest water. This shows that

Question 6

Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below.

A greedy mouse saw a basket full of corn. He wanted to eat it. So, he made a small hole in the basket. He squeezed in through the hole. He ate a lot of corn. He felt full and was very happy. Now he wanted to come out. He tried to come out through the small hole. He could not. His belly was full. He tried again. But it was of no use. The mouse started crying. A rabbit was passing by. It heard the mouse's cry and asked, "Why are you crying, my friend?' The mouse explained, "I made a small hole and came into the basket to eat the corn. Now I am not able to get out through that hole." The rabbit said, "It is because you ate too much. Wait till your belly shrinks." The rabbit laughed and went away. The mouse fell asleep in the basket. The next morning his belly had shrunk. But he wanted to eat some more corn. He forgot all about getting out of the basket. So, he ate the corn and his belly was really big again. After eating, the mouse remembered that he had to escape. But obviously, he could not. So, he thought, "Oh! Now I will go out tomorrow." The cat was the next passer-by. He smelt the mouse in the basket. He lifted its lid and ate the mouse.

How did the mouse come out of the basket?

Question 7

Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below.

A greedy mouse saw a basket full of corn. He wanted to eat it. So, he made a small hole in the basket. He squeezed in through the hole. He ate a lot of corn. He felt full and was very happy. Now he wanted to come out. He tried to come out through the small hole. He could not. His belly was full. He tried again. But it was of no use. The mouse started crying. A rabbit was passing by. It heard the mouse's cry and asked, "Why are you crying, my friend?' The mouse explained, "I made a small hole and came into the basket to eat the corn. Now I am not able to get out through that hole." The rabbit said, "It is because you ate too much. Wait till your belly shrinks." The rabbit laughed and went away. The mouse fell asleep in the basket. The next morning his belly had shrunk. But he wanted to eat some more corn. He forgot all about getting out of the basket. So, he ate the corn and his belly was really big again. After eating, the mouse remembered that he had to escape. But obviously, he could not. So, he thought, "Oh! Now I will go out tomorrow." The cat was the next passer-by. He smelt the mouse in the basket. He lifted its lid and ate the mouse.

How did the rabbit come to know that there is mouse in the basket?

Question 8

Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below.

A greedy mouse saw a basket full of corn. He wanted to eat it. So, he made a small hole in the basket. He squeezed in through the hole. He ate a lot of corn. He felt full and was very happy. Now he wanted to come out. He tried to come out through the small hole. He could not. His belly was full. He tried again. But it was of no use. The mouse started crying. A rabbit was passing by. It heard the mouse's cry and asked, "Why are you crying, my friend?' The mouse explained, "I made a small hole and came into the basket to eat the corn. Now I am not able to get out through that hole." The rabbit said, "It is because you ate too much. Wait till your belly shrinks." The rabbit laughed and went away. The mouse fell asleep in the basket. The next morning his belly had shrunk. But he wanted to eat some more corn. He forgot all about getting out of the basket. So, he ate the corn and his belly was really big again. After eating, the mouse remembered that he had to escape. But obviously, he could not. So, he thought, "Oh! Now I will go out tomorrow." The cat was the next passer-by. He smelt the mouse in the basket. He lifted its lid and ate the mouse.

What was the reaction of rabbit after learning about the rat's situation?

Question 9

Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below.

A greedy mouse saw a basket full of corn. He wanted to eat it. So, he made a small hole in the basket. He squeezed in through the hole. He ate a lot of corn. He felt full and was very happy. Now he wanted to come out. He tried to come out through the small hole. He could not. His belly was full. He tried again. But it was of no use. The mouse started crying. A rabbit was passing by. It heard the mouse's cry and asked, "Why are you crying, my friend?' The mouse explained, "I made a small hole and came into the basket to eat the corn. Now I am not able to get out through that hole." The rabbit said, "It is because you ate too much. Wait till your belly shrinks." The rabbit laughed and went away. The mouse fell asleep in the basket. The next morning his belly had shrunk. But he wanted to eat some more corn. He forgot all about getting out of the basket. So, he ate the corn and his belly was really big again. After eating, the mouse remembered that he had to escape. But obviously, he could not. So, he thought, "Oh! Now I will go out tomorrow." The cat was the next passer-by. He smelt the mouse in the basket. He lifted its lid and ate the mouse.

How many days was the rat there inside the basket?

Question 10

Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below.

A greedy mouse saw a basket full of corn. He wanted to eat it. So, he made a small hole in the basket. He squeezed in through the hole. He ate a lot of corn. He felt full and was very happy. Now he wanted to come out. He tried to come out through the small hole. He could not. His belly was full. He tried again. But it was of no use. The mouse started crying. A rabbit was passing by. It heard the mouse's cry and asked, "Why are you crying, my friend?' The mouse explained, "I made a small hole and came into the basket to eat the corn. Now I am not able to get out through that hole." The rabbit said, "It is because you ate too much. Wait till your belly shrinks." The rabbit laughed and went away. The mouse fell asleep in the basket. The next morning his belly had shrunk. But he wanted to eat some more corn. He forgot all about getting out of the basket. So, he ate the corn and his belly was really big again. After eating, the mouse remembered that he had to escape. But obviously, he could not. So, he thought, "Oh! Now I will go out tomorrow." The cat was the next passer-by. He smelt the mouse in the basket. He lifted its lid and ate the mouse.

What is the tone of the passage?
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Jul 18SSC & Railway