Basel Convention (1989)

By : Neha Dhyani

Updated : May 18, 2022, 6:02

The Basel Convention (1989) is a transnational treaty that the Conference of Plenipotentiaries adopted in 1989. It stands for the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and Their Disposal.

Its primary focus is on preventing the transfer of hazardous waste from developed to less developed countries and reducing the movement of hazardous waste between nations. However, this convention does not control the movement of radioactive waste. The primary aim of this convention is to protect the human environment from the ill effects of hazardous waste at the global level.

Basel Convention (1989) - Overview

The Conference of Plenipotentiaries, Switzerland adopted the Basel Convention (1989) on 22nd March 1989, and it came into force in 1992. This international treaty has aimed to reduce the movement of dangerous waste such as toxic, flammable, explosive, and corrosive waste between countries.

In September 2019, the Ministry of Consumer Affairs Food and Public Distribution succeeded in generating an essential international environmental convention by banning all single-use plastic products in its PSUs.

Basel Convention (1989) Objective

The Basel Convention (1989) is meant to protect the human environment by achieving the necessary measures to control and regulate hazardous waste generated by the world community. It also aims to prevent the dangerous waste transfer from developed countries to LDC.

This convention also assists LDCs in the environmentally sound management of their generated hazardous and other disposable wastes. It also aims to ensure the environmentally sound management of other countries by minimising the amount and toxicity of waste that each country generates.

Countries are Members of the Basel Convention (1989)

Currently, 188 countries are members of the Basel Convention (1989). India is also a member of the Basel Convention. India signed the Basel Convention in June 1992, while it came into force on 22nd September 1992.

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Basel Convention (1989) - Kinds of Waste

The list of hazardous waste that the Basel Convention (1989) controls and regulates includes -

  • Used lead-acid batteries
  • Biomedical and healthcare wastes
  • Persistent Organic Pollutant wastes or POPs waste
  • Used Oils
  • Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) compound for electric transformers and capacitors, heat exchange fluids, additives in paint, sealants, carbonless copy paper, and plastics use.
  • Chemicals and pesticides that last for many years in the environment
  • Industries and other consumers generate chemical wastes
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Basel Convention (1989) - Important Facts

The Basel Convention (1989) adopted the Ban Amendment in 1995, and its members brought it into force on 5th December 2019

  • COP 14 is the latest meeting of the Basel Convention in April-May 2019
  • COP 15 will take place in July 2022 in Geneva

The primary objective of the Basel Convention (1989) is to protect the environment by regulating hazardous waste at a global level. This convention also handles other topical issues such as ships destined and dismantling, electronic and e-waste, illegal dumping of hazardous waste, and Mercury and asbestos wastes.

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FAQs on the Basel Convention (1989)

Q1) What is the Basel Convention (1989)?

The Basel Convention (1989) is a transnational treaty that the Conference of Plenipotentiaries adopted in 1989. It stands for the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and Their Disposal.

Q2) What is the primary objective of the Basel Convention (1989)?

The primary objective of the Basel Convention (1989) is to protect the environment by regulating hazardous waste at a global level. This convention also handles other topical issues such as ships destined and dismantling, electronic and e-waste, illegal dumping of hazardous waste, and Mercury and asbestos wastes.

Q3) How Many Countries are Members of the Basel Convention (1989)?

Currently, 188 countries are members of the Basel Convention (1989). India is also a member of the Basel Convention.

Q4) When Was the Basel Convention (1989) Adopted?

The Conference of Plenipotentiaries, Switzerland adopted the Basel Convention (1989) on 22nd March 1989, and it came into force in 1992.

Q5) When did India sign the Basel Convention (1989)?

India signed the Basel Convention (1989) in June 1992, while it came into force on 22nd September 1992.